Tag Archives: foreclosure defense attorney

EXIT STRATEGIES

(OP-ED) — The author postulates the following for things you might want to consider when all else fails. None of this commentary should be taken as legal or financial advice. If you’re a homeowner who is hurting financially, you should at least consider these options before the ship sinks.

IN THE WORLD OF FORECLOSURE

Welcome to my world of the last 12+ years. I use the “+” sign because my foreclosure scenario started back in 2003, which, upon reflection, caused me to start researching into what turned into the book Clouded Titles. That was back in October of 2008, when I began compiling all of my research into the cause and effects of the 2008 financial collapse and by December of 2010, the book was released in its 254-page format. It’s now 432 pages.

I write this post in earnest because this is the other way of saying, “What’s your end game?”

YOUR END GAME AND THE PRACTICE OF LAW

Most attorneys dealing in foreclosure defense will ask you that very question when the time comes for you to deal with someone claiming you’re in default and they want their house back. They want to know how long they can count on you to be their client.

Most attorneys won’t take your case unless you can actually tell them a valid reason WHY they should take your case. If you don’t have one, the honest attorneys will move on. Most attorneys also want to know if you intend on fighting until you can’t fight any longer. Some attorneys don’t care how long you fight, they’ll just suck your bank account dry anyway.

A lot of your response depends on whether it’s fueled with emotion, entitlement or serious legal logic. If there is a forensic issue with your property, such as dealing with failed mortgage loan servicer accounting issues, that is different than attacking the foreclosure mill law firm based on other more complex grounds, like tortfeasor claims. Sometimes you can actually settle your differences with the other side’s attorneys. More often than not however, the servicer wants your house and will stop at nothing to get it, including dummy up phony land record documents.

At the end of 2020, a lot of my investor buddies think the banks will be doing a lot of loan modifications with those who, even though they got behind in their payments, can start paying again. But there’s still that handful of tens of thousands that are the exception to the idea and won’t qualify. These folks still may have “exit opportunities”. They just haven’t realized it yet.

A lot of exit strategies are based on lack of finances altogether. The stimulus checks could never be enough. Thus, you must first sit down and have your “Come to Jesus” meeting with yourself and your spouse and family, if that’s applicable. You cannot … and should not … hide the fact that a legal action has been commenced against you, hoping it will go away because it won’t.

I talk about various “exit strategies” in my book Clouded Titles for a reason. Back in 2003, I did what’s known as a “strategic default”. I walked away from a high-priced, 80/20 predatory mortgage loan, knowing I had a better deal elsewhere. But, at least I had a better deal elsewhere. Most of those reading this post will not and/or do not. My “end game” was to walk away. No cash for keys. Nada. I was already upside down from the word “go”, so leaving was a no brainer. Unless I did something drastically sensible, I would continue to throw good money after bad. I moved into one of my rental properties and sent Ocwen the keys. Not that many are fortunate enough to have that kind of “back door” but it doesn’t mean there couldn’t be one.

The way I look at it, if you have no equity in the house to begin with, whatever money you threw at the property initially amounts to nothing more than short-term rent payments. That money is gone. What you do with the rest of your funds means everything at this point.

HISTORY DOES REPEAT ITSELF

Because of the fact history repeats itself and the Glass-Steagall Act has still not been reinstated, the banks are still playing in the securities business and REMIC trusts abound. As long as there is an “arm’s length” issue that keeps the borrowers away from the investors of these trusts, courts will continue to kick people to the curb at the whims of the REMICs’ trustees.

Because of the Spokeo v. Robins case, injury in fact has to be proven. This is where the Exit Strategy is most important because attorneys don’t recognize that the investors aren’t the ones that are being harmed, at least not always. Yes, there have been lawsuits by investors against these REMIC pools because there were discrepancies in the quality of the loans they “bought into”. I don’t personally feel the least bit sorry for any of the greedy bastards. They deserved what they got. They saw a way to piggyback on top of the banking industry’s profits. But were they injured? No one is asking them or their trustee to prove it. Why not?

Think about that. If the REMIC’s trustee or some third-party junk debt pool is dragging you into a foreclosure process, it’s because the trustee (who claims to represent the certificate holders of a certain trust) says you’re in default and the certificate holders were harmed, when in fact, just the opposite is true. You may not have made your payments, but the servicer of the REMIC trust was required to make them for you anyway, regardless of whether you paid or not. So, it’s really not the certificate holders that were harmed, it was the servicer (or sub-servicer) who had to shell out millions of dollars out of its coffers to cover the advances due on the Distribution Date every month. THAT’S who is coming after the homeowners in foreclosure, not the “lender” REMIC. The REMIC is an entity that is tax-exempt as a pass-through trust. Nothing more. It made misrepresentations to the certificate holders about what they were investing in. That’s not our problem. We have to show our payments were paid whether we’re the ones who paid them or not. But what does the servicer do? Its attorneys bring in pay statements, showing the judge when was the last time you paid on your mortgage … then they call you a deadbeat … and just like that, you lose your home.

What’s wrong with that picture? Sometimes, the servicer doesn’t even bring in pay statements and the court still gives away your home … to an entity that actually may not deserve it.

Your time to discover that there was an issue with your mortgage loan was the first time you got notice that your servicer changed and another servicer started demanding money from you. But instead of researching the land records and looking for bogus assignments to do a C & E on, most homeowners were too self-absorbed to realize what was going on until it was too late to do anything about it.

THE GSE’S ARE NO DIFFERENT … THEY JUST HIDE IT BETTER!

If you go to irs.gov and type Publication 938 for any given year in the search tool and look at the documents that come up, you’d be amazed to see how many Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae REMIC trusts there are in existence. These are the REMIC trust that each of these government-sponsored entities (GSE’s) are the administrators for. They are like a trustee except when they come into court, they come in on their own behalf … most of the time. In non-judicial settings, it’s always the servicers that come knocking, preceded by suspect documents being recorded in the land records. When you’ve seen as much of this bullshit as I have, all of this becomes “old hat”.

I might as well be the judge that says, “What else ya got?” It’s the same shit. Just a different day. And no one is the wiser when the servicer transfers ownership of your property to the GSE when it’s all done because you’re too busy trying to figure out your exit strategy, after it’s too late and you’re treading water.

WHY DO WE CAPITULATE TO THESE BANKS?

There’s just something inside each one of us that twists our stomach in knots when we finally realize what’s happened. We can no longer be in denial. Some entity out there (run by a bunch of misguided minions who think everything they’re doing is legal) is coming to take our most precious commodity away from us … shelter.

Remember when I previously stated that the three most precious commodities in America today are food, water and shelter. Anyone who deals in these businesses will continue to survive because they have access to those three commodities. There is a fourth commodity that shouldn’t be overlooked: transportation. A lot of people have depended on their cars for a place to live because there was nowhere else to go. Sadly, I had to live in my car for a month (back in the 70’s). It wasn’t any fun. Going to gas station rest rooms to clean up was no fun either.

Those who have no “end game” when the time comes will be scrambling at the last minute, driven by panic and not common sense, to play in a condition I have previously described as the Titanic Syndrome. In other words, it’s every man for himself … man the lifeboats. Wait! There aren’t enough lifeboats and the ship has just hit an iceberg and is listing. The band strikes up with Nearer My God To Thee as passengers fight each other for space. Those who didn’t make the lifeboats get sucked down into the ice cold depths of hell when the ship finally turns on its end and sinks to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. Those who remain are floating on the surface are left clinging onto pieces of driftwood, which is what My Heart Will Go On-type movies are made of. And doesn’t all of this just tug at your emotions?

Instead of doing something productive to get away from this situation, we keep clinging onto what’s left of our scenario, when we should have damned well realized that the mortgage loans we took out are going to be the death of our equity in life. We were too slow to react, which is why I write this column. Yes, we need shelter; however, HOW and WHERE we get it should have been more thoughtfully researched … and weren’t … because, again, most of us got caught up in the emotion of buying more home than we could afford. As a result, we’d rather be all stressed out, suffer from heart attacks, family discord, suicide, murder-suicide … all thanks to a situation that was created by the banks and made all too easy for folks to access. Every day you do nothing means your equity (that which you still have in yourself, I like to think of it as sweat equity) is going to waste.

The first time we capitulated to the banks is when we took out a securitized mortgage loan that was registered in the MERS® System. The second time we capitulated to the banks is when 97%+ of us bugged out when we got a foreclosure notice. We did all of this out of ignorance and false hope because we were promised things that did not come true for our futures. Putting false hope that a bank is going to come and rescue you or even cares about you is your first mistake, which is why you have to strategize about your own realistic future and make a decisive move towards that end.

SINCE I GOT INTO BUILDING HOUSES … MY THOUGHT PROCESS HAS BEEN ALTERED SOMEWHAT

Tiny homes are nothing new; however, the idea that you could scale down into one and tell the bank to piss off seems to ring true with a lot of folks these days. This is why banks don’t want jury trials in foreclosure cases because chances are, there are a lot of folks that hate banks as much as the foreclosure-affected person does. We all have our reasons for doing what we do. However, imagine being able to use your resources to acquire a small plot of land somewhere and put a temporary shelter on it that you could live in while you build a bigger home from the ground up and you could use that shelter for an office or guest cottage later. How does that sound? What if you could mount that cottage onto a trailer and tow it around with you and go mobile? A lot of people are doing that these days, except they’re buying big, bulky RV’s that suck gas and are in no way energy efficient, are cumbersome to navigate and are a waste of money anyway (I’ve had RV dealers tell me that personally).

To me, tiny homes are just a way of temporarily downsizing until the moment comes where you can seize a better opportunity for yourself.

IT’S JUST STUFF …

Another thing folks have a problem with is letting go of material possessions they don’t need. If you’re a hoarder, your scenario becomes more than a mental challenge. You’re in a world of your own and anything that disturbs it will cause serious health complications.

Downsizing is one thing if you have time to part with your property before the bank does, especially if there’s that much equity to be had. But could you imagine being able to become self-employed and work out of your own portable home? You could rent a space in an RV park and take on work locally for that matter. There are a lot of ways to turn lemons into lemonade if you just put your mind to it. Since food is one of the key ingredients in the game, your plot of land could serve as a garden and supply you with an income doing truck farming, an all cash business.

Or if you have a professional service you could offer where you don’t spend a lot of time in any one area (like handyman, painting or other simple construction work like day laboring, it would be nothing to be able to pick up cash to stay afloat while YOU decide HOW you want to live … and not the bank or its servicer deciding HOW YOU SHOULD LIVE (broke and homeless in a tent city somewhere). To the banks, it’s a numbers game. You’re just a number. Don’t you just hate that thought?

I like what I’m building now, because the house is made out of steel SIPS panels. The walls are 4″ thick with EPS foam insulation and have 6″ in the roof. The panels are made from 26-gauge Galvalume® steel, sandwiched around the insulation to provide airtight and watertight, non-toxic living! These homes are Category 5 hurricane resistant and have no termites because there’s nothing to feed off of within the entire structure itself. The structure will also save 50-60% on energy bills, which means nothing if you’re renting an RV space but everything if you’re on the grid in a fixed location. Yet, you can take this same concept and for way less money, construct a portable home that is energy efficient in almost any climate.

The alternate exit strategy here would be to downsize to something smaller more manageable or even mortgage free (having a free small home to live in, even if temporary, is better than having to pay rent), despite having to make a small land payment every month. At least, that’s manageable.

I did that very thing in 2007. Back in 2003, I acquired a 12-acre parcel of land, which I later sold at a handsome profit. By the time 2007 arrived, I had acquired a used, single-wide mobile home and fixed it up to the point you couldn’t even tell it was a mobile home when you set foot inside. I had a land payment of $222 a month for 10 years for almost an acre of land. I lived in that mobile home for 4 years and lived within my means while I continued to help homeowners fight foreclosure. I made use of the barter network too. I use this example to illustrate what a little imagination and creative financing can do to make you mortgage free. As part of the land sale in 2007, I had the buyer pay off all my existing debt and move the mobile home from the 12 acres to the 2/3rd’s acre and connect the septic and utilities and make the land downpayment. What the buyer couldn’t pay for in cash, I had him pay off using his credit cards and sweat equity on trade! How’s THAT for creative financing? There are ways to do a lateral move that will cost you way less money if you’ll just strategize HOW you’ll get there, HOW LONG you’ll stay in that situation and HOW you’ll survive while you’re in that situation. I made it work, so can you.

There are places where land is cheaper to acquire and many times, owners will finance it if you have any kind of down payment. You might have to relocate to a different part of America but if you’re in a situation where there’s no income in one given area doesn’t mean there won’t be in another. You have to do your due diligence. Maybe the market you’re living in has outlived YOUR usefulness and it’s time to seriously seek out greener pastures.

BEING NOMADIC DOESN’T MEAN YOU’RE A GYPSY

There’s other interesting ideas about being nomadic:

  1. One could go “off grid”, so to speak, because the utilities used to power a portable home are rented and not in your name (for cash);
  2. One could remove the SIM card and battery from a cell phone making it difficult for one’s movements to be tracked or contact traced (or get disposable burner phones) and only return calls from a central number, like that of an answering service;
  3. If a given state allows a property to be placed in a land trust, putting the property in a trust name that can’t be tracked to an individual personally serves as an asset shield (vehicles can be put into trusts too);
  4. One could easily turn a portable home into a Faraday cage with very little effort, especially if it’s built out of steel SIPS panels;
  5. There are ways to disable a vehicle’s GPS system so the vehicle can’t be tracked (if it is equipped with such);
  6. The nomad is mobile and can navigate into areas under quarantine for any reason without too much difficulty and still conduct business;
  7. Since the nomad would travel with the home, it’s always close by and easier to monitor no matter where the location;
  8. There’s nothing stopping one from taking “extended vacations” when not tied down to a mortgage loan;
  9. The vehicle and the home it’s tied to is 100% owned and not mortgaged; and
  10. The idea of being nomadic is that life is too short and should be lived to the fullest when not being encumbered by the problems of the world.

It’s really hard for most people to come to grips with the fact that everything in life is temporary and that we only have it for a short while. The thing is … one of the oldest principles my dad taught me was to pay for what you want with cash and not use credit. Credit could become the devil’s playground if not used wisely.

While this may seem extreme to some, I’ve known folks who have made a living working flea markets all over the country and have managed just fine. They’ve figured out a way to sell collectibles or some other disposable product and make a living out of it. Many set up accounts on eBay and you’d be surprised how many single moms actually go to the garage sales and flea markets, buy a lot of items in bulk and sell them online at a huge profit. It’s a great way to navigate and make an income during a lockdown. People get frustrated when they’re cooped up, so they go online and shop, many times buying stuff they don’t need. Conversely, most Americans are so frustrated and upset because of the political climate that surrounds them they miss opportunities that are right in front of them because they worry about things that are beyond their control and it consumes them.

The one thing about being nomadic, you only need internet access to run an eBay account. If anything, I might add that there are mechanisms the government can use to track a person’s income, especially if they had an eBay account. But no one said someone couldn’t run it as a home-based business and take advantages of all that Uncle Sam’s tax deductions have to offer. Ponder that for a minute. I know a guy that worked out of a satellite postal store for years, re-established credit in the name of his business and paid no income tax because he didn’t make the minimum required to even file a tax return. But this is why “the system” keeps toying with the idea of a cashless society, so it can track every single movement and control the individual. Doesn’t that kind of sound like Communism to you?

And just look what’s going on in Russia today. The country has a huge underground economy and a lot of organized crime that has taken over government. And the sheeple here do not realize what they’re in for. Concern for your safety should also drive your thought process when it comes to the “end game” as to where to relocate to start over.

The beauty of an exit strategy is … you have the opportunity to reinvent yourself.

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2020 FORECLOSURES BACK IN FULL SWING!

(BREAKING NEWS, OP-ED) — The author of this post carefully posits this article for your educational benefit and any information shared here should not be construed to be legal advice. 

Anyone familiar with this online blog is probably fully well aware that the content shared on this site has a lot of legal undertones, so much so, that many people are apt to misinterpret what’s being said in reality, replacing their thought processes with directives shared as “suggestions” on this site (hence the need for the disclaimer).

The state bar associations are starting to find themselves in a real dilemma.  Three states (Washington, Utah and Arizona) have already initiated non-lawyer “paraprofessional” objectives to allow more folks to have access to the justice system.  This comes at a time when eviction moratoriums have pretty much been lifted and the “man behind the curtain” jumps out and reveals himself  in the form of service of process.

This author is getting closer to deciding a date for when another Foreclosure Defense 101 class should be held.  Of course, with no one willing to fly anywhere, this will probably be held online in webinar format, where you get to ask questions via the chat box.

The thing about foreclosures … statistically, 97% or better of those receiving service of process (notice from the bank via physical delivery via a knock on the door, certified mail, notice of publication, door hanger, etc.) will ultimately decide to pack their belongings and bug out, if what happened after the 2008 financial collapse is any indication.  Maybe we have more liquidity than we did before, maybe we don’t.  If we don’t have the resources to fight, it’s because we’re fighting the urge to resist identifying where those resources are.  The author describes those resources more fully in his book Clouded Titles.

If there was a way you could fight a foreclosure and stay in your home for over two years, would the information in a webinar workshop be worth it to you to have in your arsenal of legal tools?

Then … prepare yourself for the fight (not of your life) that generally sickens most people.  Prepare yourself mentally NOT to do stupid stuff (like give in so quickly).

The legal system has provided us with so many stall tactics (NO! Bankruptcy is NOT one of them!) it’s a wonder more people haven’t stopped to “catch on”.  They just want off the merry-go-round because that’s pretty much what you’ll feel like you’re on when you engage in fighting the foreclosure; however, the merry-go-round is not spinning at 3 miles an hour … it’s spinning at more like 60 miles an hour!  The closer you get to your court date, the faster the merry-go-round speeds up.

If you’ve ever been to a “rocket docket”, like this author has multiple times … it’s a scary thought … watching a judge clear a courtroom of homeowners being foreclosed on in 3 hours or less (just in time for lunch), with their actual case hearings lasting two minutes or less.  It’s amazing how many homeowners complain that they have no access to “justice” when in fact, the legal system has never been more “giving”.  The information highway is chuck full of data if you know where to look.

Planning Your Strategy … in 5 steps! 

#1:

Remember the Harry Potter movie where Hagrid (while strolling down Diagon Alley) tells Harry, “If you know where to go …”?   Half your battle is in research.  If you don’t check your chain of title, you’ll end up choking your chicken in frustration.  (The author doesn’t mince words here.)  This is THE MOST important point in the entire schematic of foreclosure defense, especially when it comes to playing the delay game and playing it well.  If you don’t understand the chain of title, the author’s website offers a COTA Workshop that you can get via download in (4) 4-hour sessions and listen, watch and study what’s necessary to get through from Point A to Point B.

Once you’ve looked at your chain of title, the next fundamental issue in your quest to research details is getting at the truth.  The “truth” the way banks see things and the way YOU should see things all has to do with perception of what the documents in your chain of title say.  The chain of title is like an electric schematic, which tells you HOW things are connected in the series of conveyances, claims of lien and security instruments, which are designed as the hinge pin in claiming ownership of your collateral (your home).  Once you understand how all of this is postured, it makes things a lot clearer in your understanding of HOW to proceed.

#2:

Get copies of every document in the chain of title and examine each one that is relevant to your current situation, especially the assignments (of mortgage or deed of trust).  These little minuscule pages are where the devil is in the details.  A single-page assignment that contains all sorts of false and misrepresentative statements can be the bank’s undoing, at least in the short term.  Filing a quiet title action is NOT what you’re going to pursue in your research.  You’re not ready for that yet.

History has taught us that anyone running into court trying to quiet their title when it’s littered with all sorts of bullshit assignments is not only a big waste of your time and the court’s time, your foreclosure mill attorney will immediately pick up on your strategy and counterpunch you with motions to dismiss.  Quiet title works when there’s nothing left in the chain of title other than a lingering deed of trust or mortgage that’s not connected to anyone and the originating lender is defunct and can’t be found.  The idea here is to attack the assignments head on through a C & E action.  C & E is an acronym for Cancellation and Expungement action, which means you’re filing a declaratory relief action wherein you’re asking the court to examine a document for false statements and to cancel the document and order the clerk or recorder to remove the document completely from the land records in your county so the document has no legal force and effect against your property any longer.   This is what Al West and I developed into a workshop called The C & E on Steroids!, also available in DVD video/book combo form!  There’s nearly 14 hours of really good educational information packed into this kit.  This is the ammo one would use to fight those pesky assignments.  Here’s an idea! Once you’ve done it, make your investment back by helping others achieve success in this realm.

#3:

Knowing where to find the petitions and responsive pleadings is your next research step. There are websites that are devoted to supplying this kind of information if you don’t have time to wait for a pleadings and procedures book for your specific state. You can find these types of books in law libraries and they aren’t voluminous and most of them are self-explanatory.  It’s easy to simply make copies from the book on the pleadings you need (or buy the book online from a legal bookstore).  This author has spend hundreds of hours in the law library “chasing cases” because foreclosure mill attorneys are famous for throwing them around in their pleadings in an attempt to make their point tot the court about how they’re right and you’re wrong.  Many times however, these attorneys throw cases in there that are NOT applicable at all to the scenario you’re dealing with and you have every opportunity to thwart their moves (like one big, giant chess match).

Foreclosure mill lawyers have their own set of schematics too.  They know them well, like a flow chart of procedures.  This is what they get paid for … to execute on that flow chart every time they get a case.  They eat, breathe and shit this stuff on a daily basis and thus, THAT mindset is what you’re up against when you face these shysters in court.  You have the right to be treated as an equal by the court if you can’t afford representation, which means if the attorney says you want a “free house”, you get to stand up, object on the grounds that, “My worthy opponent is at his best when not inhibited by the facts, your Honor!”  In other words, you just matched wits with this lawyer by eloquently calling him a goddamned liar!

This is where research will help you become equally prepared to challenge his or her legal acumen because they will use every dirty trick in the book (like they’ve used on other unsuspecting victims of foreclosure). Facing off in court is not for the faint of heart either … and neither is being unprepared for the battle for the judge’s mind.

#4:

Framing your arguments is probably the biggest mess that a homeowner (or their attorney) can create, especially when it comes to beer belly budgets.  Most attorneys went to law school and learned what California attorney Al West calls, the “shotgun approach”.  This means (in short) … sue as many people as you can for everything under the sun and see what sticks.  Unfortunately, what most pissed-off homeowners don’t realize is that naming multiple defendants costs money: (a.) in developing the case against each defendant and the allegations against them; (b.) in the time it takes to complete the pleadings preparation; (c.) in filing and servicing costs ($300-$400 in filing fees and $60.00 per defendant served); (d.) in responsive pleadings to each defendant (after they file their answer to your complaint); and (e.) case management.  Each defendant will cost an average of $3,000 in legal fees, not counting discovery (via a deposition) which adds another $3,000 in approximate costs for each defendant deposed.  To make the math more simple, let’s say you have an attorney that wants to sue 5 defendants and wants advance testimony from each of them. Without even batting an eye, you’re up to roughly $30,700 and the judge hasn’t even reviewed your case yet.  Until you start evaluating your arguments, you have no idea what a lawsuit (or counterclaim) against a foreclosure is going to cost you.

While an answer to a judicial action can be a simple process, compulsory counterclaims aren’t.  If you’re trying to buy time, filing an answer in a judicial proceeding will buy you an average of 60 days, or until a court date is set and you get notice of it.

And all of the arguments in the world won’t help if you can’t keep track of timelines.  One of the biggest mistakes pro se litigants make is not keeping an eye on the court docket once a foreclosure proceeding has been commenced and the battle begins.  Not keeping track of the timelines and what the Rules of Civil Procedure mandates you must do in order to stay in the game successfully can kill a case with one missed filing or one missed hearing.  The other side will use their arsenal of tricks to up-end your best laid plans, especially when it comes to beating you on civil procedure.

#5:

With judicial process, you at least get your day in court, yet most homeowners don’t take advantage of that because they’re too busy running scared. Now imagine being in the middle of a perceived pandemic and facing a banking tyrant and its attorney head-on when all you can think about is how to avoid a potential brush with death.

With a non-judicial process, locking horns with the lender in court is the only way you’re going to stop this kind of foreclosure because the lender has resorted to advertising and selling your property on the courthouse steps instead and if you’re like the author, you’d want your day in court and the only way to get it is to file a lawsuit against the servicer and any parties coming against you that have made themselves “relevant” parties.

One would at least want to find at least one defendant in-state.  This is how diversity jurisdiction is defeated because lenders will quickly remove cases to federal court because the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000 and the plaintiff lives in one state, while the defendant lives in another state.  In-state defendants could include: (a.) document manufacturing plant employees; (b.) local law firms bringing the foreclosure action; and (c.) lenders whose headquarters are domiciled in whatever state you are filing the action in.  This won’t work if the bank is just a branch of a main bank headquartered outside of your state.  Most people don’t sue the trustee, unless the trustee (named within the deed of trust or substituted into it using a Substitution of Trustee document that follows a bogus assignment).  Then … it’s open season on the trustee.  Attorneys will give you a lot of push back on this because they don’t like suing within their own profession nor do they especially like suing trustees.  The trustee  is supposed to be a neutral party; however, when they do something totally egregious, there is established case law in most states that can wield an axe in the form of liability.

Again, the biggest issue is picking a fight with the wrong party.  Generally, rampant emotions cause bad decision making and that is another fine line item that gets homeowners in trouble.  If you’re going to litigate, let logic replace emotion.  You’ll need logic along for the ride.  There’s plenty of time for celebration later when you’ve effectuated your “Plan B” all the while holding the lender at bay.

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THINGS TO PONDER WHEN IT COMES TO THE “DELAY GAME” IN FORECLOSURES …

(OP-ED) — The author of this post is a consultant to foreclosure defense attorneys and does not offer the following as legal advice but rather as that of the author’s own views based on past experience in paralegal and consulting work.  The post, with the related case example, is for educational purposes only.  

THE “DILEMMA” ONLY GETS BIGGER

I have seen countless cases where a foreclosure defense was mounted against a bank’s attempt to foreclose when there are obvious “glitches” with the bank’s case.  It is in this instance where I offer the following case for your perusal:

US Bank v Manning, 2020 ME 42 (Apr 2, 2020)

The one thing you’ll notice right up front is that at the time of this author’s post, this case was almost 10 years old by the time it got to Maine’s highest court.  I believe I can use any case from any state to exemplify what constitutes a “do-over” after 10 years of throwing money away on attorney’s fees.  I would venture a guess that the property was worth almost what the homeowner (Manning) shelled out in attorney’s fees.  He would not be the first party (as a defendant in a foreclosure case) to spend exorbitant sums trying to stay in his home, all because he thinks he’s “right”.

I would have posted this earlier but due to the corona-crisis and the resulting issues that followed our first recognition of it as a pandemic, I’m now just getting around to this.  My point here is that foreclosure defense means putting whatever remaining resources you have at risk.

Let me explain in ten (10) easy points …

  1. Fighting any case where a REMIC trust is involved means that it’s highly likely bogus documents were created by the servicer’s employees at the direction of either the servicer or the foreclosure mill law firm prosecuting the foreclosure.  That in itself is a minimum of an 18-month delay if the court indulges declaratory relief.
  2. Fighting a foreclosure case when you’re unemployed with limited resources is futile, especially if you’re faced with draining a retirement account, like a 401(k), which by the way, the bank won’t ever get access to via judgment; however, you’d be surprised at how many cases I have gone through where the homeowners did just that in order to pay attorney’s fees.
  3. Fighting a foreclosure case when you’re simply holding the property as an investor is also risky given the courts’ propensity (as in this case) to give the bank a “d0-over”, even if the investor was “right” all along.  Those attorney’s fees are risked capital that could be put somewhere else if the market value and economic condition of the property won’t support it.
  4. As a follow-up to the last paragraph, many homeowners don’t actually make an honest effort to get their property evaluated, whether through an appraisal or a comparable market analysis (CMA) by a real estate agent, to see what the “gamble” is worth compared to risk. Their fight is driven by emotion and not common sense.  If the property is economically challenged, meaning it’s going to need thousands of dollars in repairs and upgrades to make it marketable, it’s not worth spending the money while fighting a foreclosure just because you don’t like the idea of moving to new digs.
  5. On the other side of this equation, I could imply that I’ve spent the last 12 years of my life helping homeowners fight to stay in their homes, only to see the bank win after the homeowners have spent thousands, many of whom got stuck paying the other side’s attorney’s fees because they lost … plus, they had to pay their own foreclosure defense attorney’s fees.  Talk about a great case for neurosis.  I feel guilty sometimes because I’ve given the bank’s attorneys an income, because the banks will pay to get a “win” in their favor.  That is counterproductive in my book, when the homeowner could have cut and run and moved into something more affordable and put it into a trust before things got “dicey”.
  6. Fighting standing issues is the most common thing and judges are keenly aware of that modus operandi. Every attorney will tell you that you should claim the other side lacks standing because it’s a great catch-all if all else fails; however, claiming anything comes with a price.
  7. Because many foreclosure defense tactics are emotionally driven, this has created a “cha-ching, cha-ching” scenario for attorneys who see a real monthly annuity staring them in the face every time a disgruntled homeowner thinks they’re “right”.  It creates impetus that has fueled the business model that many law firms and sole practitioner’s rely on to “stay in their game” even if you lose in the end.
  8. In Manning’s case, this 10-year stretch compares to other cases I’ve looked at, where homeowners have sold businesses to pay lawyer’s fees, knowing that the chain of title documents were trash to begin with, yet a lot of these types of attacks fall on deaf ears with the courts. Without proper case planning as to how the court will react, it’s throwing good money after bad.  What homeowners end up doing is “kitchen sink” pleadings … and these types of pleadings are what racks up attorney’s fees … on both sides of the equation.  This is the primary reason why foreclosure mill law firms don’t come after me (if they happen to find out I’m involved in a case) because they’re getting attorney’s fees too … and then some.  How does it feel knowing that this kind of risk exists, even though you’re trying to do the right thing?
  9. I was given a specific sum certain of over $100,000 spent in fighting a foreclosure for 10 years … and the homeowners lost anyway. What I could have bought with that $100,000 over time (a duplex, where I live in one side and rent out the other side to make my mortgage payments; an apartment building, maybe a 4-plex, where I live in one of the apartments and rent out the other three) instead of giving an attorney an opportunity to create a thriving law practice at my expense.
  10. In this case, the economics of “the game” don’t make sense.  With all of the moves and countermoves in this case, which parallel many other complex cases I’ve looked at, giving a bank a “do-over” (dismissing a case without prejudice), means the bank gets to hit your “reset button” and you get to start all over again defending another foreclosure.  My point on this last comment is, “What’s it worth to your health?”

Given the corona-crisis, with over 15-million claims for unemployment benefits being applied for (many of them mortgagors), you can bet when the moratorium on foreclosures has expired (whenever that may be), there may be some mortgage loan servicers that are going to “take it on the chin” in advance payments so much so, they’ll look for the first opportunity to come after your house.  You can bet if they haven’t filed documents in the land records to “support their claim”, it’s highly likely they will either during or shortly after this crisis ends.

My bottom line (while trying not to be verbose here) … foreclosure defense costs money.  Delay tactics cost money.  Playing the game costs money. It is a “game” to the banks because they play by the numbers while you’re playing with your hard-earned money and equity.  They have the clear advantage because they’re the mortgagees.  They have a contract that you signed.  The deck is already stacked ahead of your decision-making processes.  Understand that whatever claims you bring should be supported by a Plan B.  This is part of foreclosure defense too.  What happens if what you’re trying to do doesn’t work?  This is why I wrote Clouded Titles.

THE CORONA-CRISIS HAS MULTIPLE “SIDE EFFECTS” … 

The corona-crisis is going to produce more than just statistical death tolls.  We have been victimized by both the World Health Organization (who is part of the United Nations), who failed to give us the information before the virus spread to America and the Chinese Communist Party (who created the synthesized product in the Wuhan Level 4 lab in the first place … then covered it up with a lame “wet seafood market” story), which is going to create more than a viral pandemic in terms of loss of life. We’re talking an economic twist of the tail that is going to set off another serious wave of foreclosure filings across the country due to the servicers’ struggle to make advance payments to REMIC investors.

Loan modifications are going to be rare after this is over.  Forbearances … well, if you’re lucky.  You may be emotional now … but just remember what kind of financial position you were in before the corona-crisis hit.  This doesn’t stop foreclosures already in progress.  On top of that, you’ve had a financial “hit” just trying to stay alive during the “lockdown” period and the neuroses this has caused … you also have to look at the emotion and health issues (fueled by stress) which weaken your body’s immune system because of what’s coming.  You will be looking to the government for answers … and the answers won’t be there.  The courts will be backlogged.  Your judicial foreclosures will cost more as the courts clear the pipeline of cases. Non-judicial foreclosures will proceed at lightning speed because the servicers have had plenty of time to crank out paperwork (default notices, notices of trustee’s sales, suspect assignments, etc.) during the crisis while the moratoriums existed.  They know this crisis has hit everyone in the pocketbooks, including the mortgage loan servicers themselves.

Now’s the time to come up with a Plan B.

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WILL THERE BE AN UPTICK IN FORECLOSURES ONCE THE CORONA-CRISIS IS OVER?

(OP-ED) — The author of this post is a consultant to attorneys on foreclosure and chain of title matters and none of the following opinions should be constituted as legal advice or seek to guarantee a legal outcome. It posits what this author sees as what is to come.  It may not be the “whole new way of life” everyone thinks is going to take place due to this pandemic. 

This post is not for the faint of heart nor is it designed to make you more paranoid than most of you probably already are.  It is designed to impart some common sense rationality into dealing with the post-traumatic issues of what we collectively are all perceiving as a “crisis”.

Some of us think this whole thing is overblown.  The majority however have unknowingly allowed the “crisis” to replace common sense with survival fear … and rightly so.  It’s one thing to think that the coronavirus was just going to stay put in China when in fact, we have such an upwardly mobile society that everyone has been instilled with traveling to different parts of the world, be it on a plane, on a cruise, whatever … no one expected this would hit America and I believe we were all duped as to the “numbers” and the “purpose” for COVID-19.

Here are some interesting “takes” I’ve picked up on over the last couple of weeks …

  1. Chinese-Americans who are loyal to this country have stated to me that China well understated the numbers of dead and infected as the result of the viral spread there.
  2. The understatement was intentional, to lull us all (and I mean the World Health Organization (WHO) and the countries affected by the virus, including America) into a false sense of security so we would continue to go on about our daily lives as if this virus really didn’t matter.
  3. Knowing that we were already embroiled in political turmoil in this country, we’ve been “played” by the Chinese in a further effort to destroy the credibility of many of our elected leaders and further create political dissension in our every day lives.
  4. Most of the world was not medically ready for another pandemic.  If WHO was really concerned with the spread of this virus, it should have reacted more quickly when it was observed that the virus was spreading outside of China’s borders.
  5. We can all point fingers at our government for being “reactive”, because that is how our government has always been … reactive instead of proactive.  We weren’t ready for the virus when it hit our shores and we sure as hell aren’t ready for it now.
  6. Our medical systems in this country rely too much on non-essential and boutique surgeries and were not ready to deal with massive shortages in critical care supplies and labor.
  7. Our government’s medical “advisories” and social “responsibilities” were lacking in keeping its undisciplined citizenry safe from each other, allowing for Darwinistic opportunities to avail themselves upon an unsuspecting public.
  8. Instead of heading off the pandemic “at the pass”, state and local governments were slow to react to contain the virus and identify the “vectors”, which is what South Korea did when it first became aware of the invasion of the virus.
  9. The saving grace was that most state governments went above and beyond the federal measures enacted to stop evictions and foreclosures during the coronavirus outbreak.
  10. The not-so-saving grace is what happens after the fallout rears its ugly head, the supply chain breaks down in certain quarters and the economy can’t put enough people back to work fast enough to recover from the shock the country took in the 30-60 “stay in place” periods.

This is where thinks get “quirky”.

As was explained in some “insider” memorandums which I managed to retrieve through my back channels, the mortgage loan servicers (especially on these MERS-originated mortgages) have to pay advances on the distribution dates to the investors who funded the loans through the various REMICs (Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits).

There were (at last count) roughly 6.6-million people that applied for unemployment benefits, despite the economic “stimulus” package.  In my twisted mind, this is like getting a hand job by a hooker, wherein the “wham bam” happens and then you realize the relief was only temporary and you’re right back at the stress level you started from before “the act” happened.

The mortgage loan servicers who handle the payments to the REMICs (the advance payments of principal and interest on every securitized loan) every month on the distribution date, have to pay those advance payments whether borrowers make those payments or not.  I hope you got that.  No matter (during this crisis) whether you made your monthly mortgage payment or not, you are NOT in default because the servicer has been making your payments anyway.  They just won’t tell you that.

The problem becomes worse however when the servicers have to make these payments regularly over time, believing that they can collect the the past due payments from the borrowers (who are out of work or close to being out of work or short on funds) who are wanting a forbearance on their mortgage loans.  This means the servicers would have to consider putting the payments (including interest) on the back end of the loan.  This means that for those of you who (for example) were on “Payment 22” of your amortization chart on a 30-year fixed rate loan, you’re asking for Payments 22, 23 and 24 (plus interest) to be put on the back end of your loan, which is compounding interest upon principal upon interest.  Let’s face it, most Americans do NOT have the reserves to make the mortgage payments past one month, which is why they had to borrow the money to buy the home in the first place.

Now the mortgage loan servicers are stressed financially because the payments have to be paid into the securitized trust pool every month, regardless of the borrowers’ circumstances.  The servicers may be forced into “having to rob Peter to pay Paul”, which means the servicers will borrow from escrow accounts all over their servicing network of mortgages, in the hopes that they’ll be able to repay those escrow accounts back over time.  The problem is, when that doesn’t happen (and even at the time funds were borrowed from escrows), there is still a shortage in the escrow accounts that the servicers borrowed from to pay the REMICs their monthly payments to.  A prolonged period of these payments (6-9 months; if this crisis were to continue) would put the servicers in jeopardy.

Fast forward to the end of the corona-crisis … 

The mortgage loan servicers are out of pocket all of the advance payments they had to pay during the crisis, which means they’re going to be on an all-out campaign to try and recover as much of the shortfalls as possible to reimburse all of the escrows they borrowed from to keep everything looking “current” on the books (this is why servicers get in trouble).  This is one of the reasons why Ocwen got into trouble and ended up having to sell $600-million in securities to bolster its “advance” payment funds to investors.  That’s like chasing a large, lump-sum credit card payment, making minimum payments every month.  The debts just never seem to get paid off.  Most borrowers can understand that.  Now, factor that into a much larger scale.

By now, you’re beginning to see the “crisis” occurring within the ranks of the mortgage loan servicers.  They will be reluctant to do loan mods because that means more perks for the borrowers. Extensions the servicers really aren’t interested in “affording” because they’re already swimming in borrowed time.

Couple that with the borrower’s payment history of already-missed payments BEFORE the crisis was declared and you’ve just dumped gasoline on the already burning flame.  My suggestions here, which are simple to ascertain and follow:

  1. During the crisis, check your land records EVERY WEEK to see whether or not the servicer has “manufactured” any assignments using MERS (Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.) as a means to assign, transfer or convey a mortgage loan into a REMIC trust in anticipation of having to do a foreclosure.
  2. If the assignment was done BEFORE the foreclosure and you’ve already become aware of it, use this opportunity to research your chain of title and see whether or not the information contained within the assignment is false and misrepresentative.
  3. Look up the state statutes to see what felonies were committed by asserting the false and misrepresentative information into the assignment, which was subsequently recorded into the public record and begin to document all aspects of it (who created the assignment, who executed the assignment, who notarized the assignment, who are the parties named in the assignment, who caused it to be recorded, etc.) for reference.
  4. DO NOT attempt to contact any of the parties creating the allegedly-bogus assignment. This is like tipping your hand in a high-stakes poker game.  I cannot stress that enough (as a consultant to foreclosure cases).  Telling the other side of your game plan is going to jeopardize your chances for recovery down the road.  What is important is to gather as much information as possible about all of the parties mentioned within the assignment without contacting them directly.  (There will be plenty of time for that in court-controlled discovery).
  5. Obtain a certified copy of your REMIC from the United States Securities and Exchange Commission while the ink is still fresh and you can take advantage of the time lapse created by the corona-crisis which allows you some advantage in preparing a suit for cancelling and expunging the suspect assignment.

For those of you that don’t get the “gist” of attacking documents, I have a kit available (in limited supply) online at CloudedTitles.com/shopThe C&E on Steroids!   This will give you a blueprint as to how to successfully challenge the phony documents in the land records.   It’s an 8-DVD video set plus a book containing the information you’ll need to arm yourself for the upcoming “fight” I think many of you are going to be involved in.

Why is this important?   If you’re facing foreclosure, even before the crisis, this moratorium will give you time to: (a.) think about Plan B; and (b.) act on that plan.  Even the 60-day window, which has already started ticking (courtesy of the federal government and extended by various state governments) will give you enough time to get your case files together, analyze them and more forward with retaining counsel (if you haven’t already) to “fight the good fight” because the corona-crisis itself was just not enough … we’ll be seeing another wave of foreclosures when it’s over because when it comes to reimbursement of an already-depleted money supply, the servicers (who are tasked with stealing the home) will stop at nothing to take your home away from you … and sadly, the government won’t be there to bail you out.

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REMEMBER WHO THE ENEMY IS …

(BREAKING NEWS) — The author of this post is issuing this update to give you a bit more incentive to participate in the upcoming online COTA Workshop.  The information presented here is for educational purposes only; however, it’s based on years of research by this author and through discussions with attorneys who have utilized this material to their benefit. 

For those of you who are being exposed to COTA (an acronym for Chain Of Title Assessment) for the first time, or wish to intensify the study into the COTA for future use in helping others (and making a sideline income from your knowledge you’ve obtained here), let’s briefly delve into what the chain of title is and how the COTA differs from a simple “title report” issued by today’s title companies across America.

(1) Assists in identifying all known potential claimants to property

It doesn’t matter whether you’re buying a home for the first time or putting your faith in a landlord who claims to own the home he’s renting to you, it pays to understand “who’s on title”. In this day and age, more and more issues of fraudulent transfer and assignments of lien have permeated hundreds of thousands of land records, if not by crooks attempting to commit identity theft by recording false deeds, but by the very banks and secondary players “in the game” that created assignments out of thin air and caused them to be placed into the public record, all since the 2008 financial collapse!  Simply looking at the deed to a piece of property isn’t enough. The aftermath that followed the collapse (2009-2015) has been proven by this author and others to have been one giant scheme to steal property across America by some very unscrupulous sponsor-sellers on Wall Street using phony documents to get their way.  If you or this author ever attempted to do what the banks did, we’d be in jail, because the government is in bed with the banks!  The COTA helps you to identify those person(s) who say they have an interest in the property, whether by claim of ownership or by lien interest.

(2) Assists in identifying potential unknown intervening assignees

Many do not recognize the word “mesne”.  It’s pronounced “mine”.  It’s a legal term that means unidentified players within the chain of title and these players became unknown “assignees” through the use of an electronic database called Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (or “MERS”).  If you’ve read Clouded Titles, you know that MERS is currently operating under its third incorporated version, taken over in October of 2018 by the same corporate outfit that owns the New York Stock Exchange, ICE (an acronym for Intercontinental Exchange, Inc.). The mesne assignees entered the chain of title to millions of pieces of property through the use of the MERS System®.  This workshop will teach you the fundamentals of how securitization operates and just how the silent invasion of millions of phony documents entered the public recording system. It’s knowledge that has cost over 10-million Americans their homes because they didn’t have that knowledge when they took out their mortgage loans way back when.  If this workshop could save you tens of thousands of dollars in mistakes, wouldn’t that be worth it?

(3) Assists in identifying abuse to the title by lien holders & clients 

It goes without saying that millions of Americans have fallen prey to the scheme of obfuscation within the chain of title by parties that all of a sudden “claimed” an interest in any given piece of property in America simply by creating an assignment of mortgage (or deed of trust) with the intention of giving the recorded instrument legal effect for the purposes of foreclosure.  The banks and the financial industry supporting the use of MERS then proceeded to infiltrate all 3,041 public records through the use of legislation, which more than likely came into being through the use of “monetary incentives” (i.e., “the best congress money can buy”) to get legislation passed to allow a “book entry system” to permeate the land records all across America through the use (and abuse) of documents that were vague and ambiguous, which this author first discussed in the very first COTA Workshop he ever taught, as a CLE to attorneys in Texas. Now you can have access to that same information, which could help you in making what could be life and death decisions!

(4) Assists in identifying potential causes of action for use in litigation

The one thing for certain in America is that these abuses within “the system of things” has made the greater percentage of the citizens in this country litigious in one way, shape or form. The remains of those who have been foreclosed upon in the past have paved the road with bad case law because they (and their attorneys) fought with bad information, information that was passed through the legal forums throughout America by attorneys who became part of a very widespread network of what are known as foreclosure mills.  Some have fallen by the wayside, while others have only gained in strength by setting case law in their favor before most Americans (who were foreclosure victims, and their lawyers) realized what kind of legal charade was being falsely portrayed within the judicial venues throughout this country.  This author is convinced that all of this was by design, to give these foreclosure mills lots of work and as one attorney this author knows put it, “How to steal people’s homes for fun and profit.”  Sadly, 97% of all affected homeowners cut and ran, leaving the system to its own devices.  Those who fought the banks and their servicers found out the hard way that claiming “fraud” costs money … more money than the average American homeowner anticipated spending to stay in their home. There’s a right way and a wrong way to understand “the game” … and you’ll learn that in this workshop!

(5) Establishes proof of ownership in the chain of title (deraignment)

Here’s a term (deraignment) that most people don’t understand the concept of.  In this workshop, the author is going to show you not only what this term means, but how it’s applied in law!

(6) Establishes parameters for given time periods of recordation (laches)

The doctrine of laches kind of works like a ticking clock.  Many Americans have been duped into believing that once they’ve found out that they were “screwed over” by the banks, they attempted to file lawsuits against the banks and MERS, something the banks were geared up in advance to wage a winning war against these unsuspecting homeowners and their attorneys, who soon found out that there were more ways of making money than by doing simple wills and estate planning.  Welcome to the understanding of what makes a foreclosure defense lawyer tick … your paycheck in his trust account!  Laches is further explained in the COTA Workshop … which can be taken via the internet right from your very own home computer.

(7) Establishes proper document recordation value (as to sequence)

It’s not just a recorded document that makes a difference … it’s how all of the documents in the chain of title interrelate to each other.  We’re going to go into detail by showing you case studies within the COTA Workshop so you can gain an understanding of how these abuses within the chain of title occurred and how the COTA is used to formulate litigation.

(8) Establishes proper evidence to identify potential problems with title

If you had a way to identify issues within your chain of title, wouldn’t that make your understanding of future litigation more practical?  This is why so many attorneys across America have read Clouded Titles. In fact, this book (written by the author who is teaching this online COTA Workshop) was recommended to homeowners by U.S. Bankruptcy Court Trustees!  This means that the information contained within this book (and this author’s subsequent teachings) was very quickly picked up by “the system” and integrated into its database of legal knowledge.  As a bonus … for those of you taking the online COTA Workshop … you’re going to receive a complimentary copy of this book that has gotten the attention of even the federal judiciary!  Suing for everything under the sun (including the kitchen sink) is a big waste of time and money.  This online COTA Workshop will teach you the basics of understanding what the aspects of litigation are and how you, as a past, present and future homeowner, can benefit from understanding the fundamental issues within chains of title that have been affected by the schemes perpetrated by the banks and their henchmen.  This goes way beyond what title companies will ever reveal … because the title companies are “in on it”!

(9) Raises potential legal issues based on research of statutory violations

This author has written other publications which explore the universe of legal claims based on violations of statute.  Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to understand how and where to find this information … and the author will show you how in the online COTA Workshop!

(10) Raises potential legal issues based on unproven but evident fraud

Fraud! Fraud! Fraud!  That’s all this author hears homeowners bleat (like sheep to the slaughter).  Learn what the potential legal issues are without becoming a victim of them!  It’s a very expensive proposition … something this author knows could save you tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees just by your gaining an understanding of how you (as a homeowner) have been duped.

(11) Raises awareness of concern by the Preparer as to legal consideration

If you were going to help others (while making a living doing COTAs) avoid these same pitfalls, wouldn’t it be nice to know exactly HOW the author came to understand the fundamental concept of how the chain of title works?  Spending tens of thousands of dollars in litigation costs makes everyone but you (the homeowner) rich.  Why drop that big dime if you can possibly avoid it?  We’ll even be discussing quiet title and the use of declaratory judgment actions as a part of the common strategy to get to the truth of the matter involving chain of title!

(12) Raises the stakes of potential legal claims for damages

Out of these dozen reasons why you should consider taking this online COTA Workshop … if you had a clear and concise understanding of what you were up against and knew the real issues within your chain of title (or could research the chain of title for a prospective property you wish to acquire as a means of building equity), wouldn’t it be nice to know that once you’re all settled in, you’re not going to become a victim of foreclosure by some unscrupulous lender, based on those mesne assignees this author talked about in the beginning of this post?  If you knew which legal claims were more profitable than others, wouldn’t that be a good thing?

The online COTA Workshop begins February 1st (that’s this coming Saturday) … why not start out the New Year with a chunk of knowledge that can not only save you thousands of dollars in legal fees, but also give you the opportunity to make a decent living while helping others avoid the pitfalls that have cost millions of Americans dearly.

Click here to register to attend! 

In addition, if you missed something … after taking the online COTA Workshop … we’ll make these sessions available to you online so you can further your studies and pick up the nuggets you may have missed while attending the online COTA Workshop … all of which you can access FREE OF CHARGE, with your paid attendance to the workshop!

Plus, by attending the online COTA Workshop, you get a complimentary copy of the book Clouded Titles!

The webinar platform will give you a chance to ask questions at the Q&A breaks in the class too!  

Knowledge is power!

The clock is ticking … what are you waiting for?

A summons to appear in court or a notice of default?

Don’t be a victim!

Arm yourself with education!

Click here to register to attend! 

 

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Filed under BREAKING NEWS, Securitization Issues, webinar, workshop