Tag Archives: trustee

2020 FORECLOSURES BACK IN FULL SWING!

(BREAKING NEWS, OP-ED) — The author of this post carefully posits this article for your educational benefit and any information shared here should not be construed to be legal advice. 

Anyone familiar with this online blog is probably fully well aware that the content shared on this site has a lot of legal undertones, so much so, that many people are apt to misinterpret what’s being said in reality, replacing their thought processes with directives shared as “suggestions” on this site (hence the need for the disclaimer).

The state bar associations are starting to find themselves in a real dilemma.  Three states (Washington, Utah and Arizona) have already initiated non-lawyer “paraprofessional” objectives to allow more folks to have access to the justice system.  This comes at a time when eviction moratoriums have pretty much been lifted and the “man behind the curtain” jumps out and reveals himself  in the form of service of process.

This author is getting closer to deciding a date for when another Foreclosure Defense 101 class should be held.  Of course, with no one willing to fly anywhere, this will probably be held online in webinar format, where you get to ask questions via the chat box.

The thing about foreclosures … statistically, 97% or better of those receiving service of process (notice from the bank via physical delivery via a knock on the door, certified mail, notice of publication, door hanger, etc.) will ultimately decide to pack their belongings and bug out, if what happened after the 2008 financial collapse is any indication.  Maybe we have more liquidity than we did before, maybe we don’t.  If we don’t have the resources to fight, it’s because we’re fighting the urge to resist identifying where those resources are.  The author describes those resources more fully in his book Clouded Titles.

If there was a way you could fight a foreclosure and stay in your home for over two years, would the information in a webinar workshop be worth it to you to have in your arsenal of legal tools?

Then … prepare yourself for the fight (not of your life) that generally sickens most people.  Prepare yourself mentally NOT to do stupid stuff (like give in so quickly).

The legal system has provided us with so many stall tactics (NO! Bankruptcy is NOT one of them!) it’s a wonder more people haven’t stopped to “catch on”.  They just want off the merry-go-round because that’s pretty much what you’ll feel like you’re on when you engage in fighting the foreclosure; however, the merry-go-round is not spinning at 3 miles an hour … it’s spinning at more like 60 miles an hour!  The closer you get to your court date, the faster the merry-go-round speeds up.

If you’ve ever been to a “rocket docket”, like this author has multiple times … it’s a scary thought … watching a judge clear a courtroom of homeowners being foreclosed on in 3 hours or less (just in time for lunch), with their actual case hearings lasting two minutes or less.  It’s amazing how many homeowners complain that they have no access to “justice” when in fact, the legal system has never been more “giving”.  The information highway is chuck full of data if you know where to look.

Planning Your Strategy … in 5 steps! 

#1:

Remember the Harry Potter movie where Hagrid (while strolling down Diagon Alley) tells Harry, “If you know where to go …”?   Half your battle is in research.  If you don’t check your chain of title, you’ll end up choking your chicken in frustration.  (The author doesn’t mince words here.)  This is THE MOST important point in the entire schematic of foreclosure defense, especially when it comes to playing the delay game and playing it well.  If you don’t understand the chain of title, the author’s website offers a COTA Workshop that you can get via download in (4) 4-hour sessions and listen, watch and study what’s necessary to get through from Point A to Point B.

Once you’ve looked at your chain of title, the next fundamental issue in your quest to research details is getting at the truth.  The “truth” the way banks see things and the way YOU should see things all has to do with perception of what the documents in your chain of title say.  The chain of title is like an electric schematic, which tells you HOW things are connected in the series of conveyances, claims of lien and security instruments, which are designed as the hinge pin in claiming ownership of your collateral (your home).  Once you understand how all of this is postured, it makes things a lot clearer in your understanding of HOW to proceed.

#2:

Get copies of every document in the chain of title and examine each one that is relevant to your current situation, especially the assignments (of mortgage or deed of trust).  These little minuscule pages are where the devil is in the details.  A single-page assignment that contains all sorts of false and misrepresentative statements can be the bank’s undoing, at least in the short term.  Filing a quiet title action is NOT what you’re going to pursue in your research.  You’re not ready for that yet.

History has taught us that anyone running into court trying to quiet their title when it’s littered with all sorts of bullshit assignments is not only a big waste of your time and the court’s time, your foreclosure mill attorney will immediately pick up on your strategy and counterpunch you with motions to dismiss.  Quiet title works when there’s nothing left in the chain of title other than a lingering deed of trust or mortgage that’s not connected to anyone and the originating lender is defunct and can’t be found.  The idea here is to attack the assignments head on through a C & E action.  C & E is an acronym for Cancellation and Expungement action, which means you’re filing a declaratory relief action wherein you’re asking the court to examine a document for false statements and to cancel the document and order the clerk or recorder to remove the document completely from the land records in your county so the document has no legal force and effect against your property any longer.   This is what Al West and I developed into a workshop called The C & E on Steroids!, also available in DVD video/book combo form!  There’s nearly 14 hours of really good educational information packed into this kit.  This is the ammo one would use to fight those pesky assignments.  Here’s an idea! Once you’ve done it, make your investment back by helping others achieve success in this realm.

#3:

Knowing where to find the petitions and responsive pleadings is your next research step. There are websites that are devoted to supplying this kind of information if you don’t have time to wait for a pleadings and procedures book for your specific state. You can find these types of books in law libraries and they aren’t voluminous and most of them are self-explanatory.  It’s easy to simply make copies from the book on the pleadings you need (or buy the book online from a legal bookstore).  This author has spend hundreds of hours in the law library “chasing cases” because foreclosure mill attorneys are famous for throwing them around in their pleadings in an attempt to make their point tot the court about how they’re right and you’re wrong.  Many times however, these attorneys throw cases in there that are NOT applicable at all to the scenario you’re dealing with and you have every opportunity to thwart their moves (like one big, giant chess match).

Foreclosure mill lawyers have their own set of schematics too.  They know them well, like a flow chart of procedures.  This is what they get paid for … to execute on that flow chart every time they get a case.  They eat, breathe and shit this stuff on a daily basis and thus, THAT mindset is what you’re up against when you face these shysters in court.  You have the right to be treated as an equal by the court if you can’t afford representation, which means if the attorney says you want a “free house”, you get to stand up, object on the grounds that, “My worthy opponent is at his best when not inhibited by the facts, your Honor!”  In other words, you just matched wits with this lawyer by eloquently calling him a goddamned liar!

This is where research will help you become equally prepared to challenge his or her legal acumen because they will use every dirty trick in the book (like they’ve used on other unsuspecting victims of foreclosure). Facing off in court is not for the faint of heart either … and neither is being unprepared for the battle for the judge’s mind.

#4:

Framing your arguments is probably the biggest mess that a homeowner (or their attorney) can create, especially when it comes to beer belly budgets.  Most attorneys went to law school and learned what California attorney Al West calls, the “shotgun approach”.  This means (in short) … sue as many people as you can for everything under the sun and see what sticks.  Unfortunately, what most pissed-off homeowners don’t realize is that naming multiple defendants costs money: (a.) in developing the case against each defendant and the allegations against them; (b.) in the time it takes to complete the pleadings preparation; (c.) in filing and servicing costs ($300-$400 in filing fees and $60.00 per defendant served); (d.) in responsive pleadings to each defendant (after they file their answer to your complaint); and (e.) case management.  Each defendant will cost an average of $3,000 in legal fees, not counting discovery (via a deposition) which adds another $3,000 in approximate costs for each defendant deposed.  To make the math more simple, let’s say you have an attorney that wants to sue 5 defendants and wants advance testimony from each of them. Without even batting an eye, you’re up to roughly $30,700 and the judge hasn’t even reviewed your case yet.  Until you start evaluating your arguments, you have no idea what a lawsuit (or counterclaim) against a foreclosure is going to cost you.

While an answer to a judicial action can be a simple process, compulsory counterclaims aren’t.  If you’re trying to buy time, filing an answer in a judicial proceeding will buy you an average of 60 days, or until a court date is set and you get notice of it.

And all of the arguments in the world won’t help if you can’t keep track of timelines.  One of the biggest mistakes pro se litigants make is not keeping an eye on the court docket once a foreclosure proceeding has been commenced and the battle begins.  Not keeping track of the timelines and what the Rules of Civil Procedure mandates you must do in order to stay in the game successfully can kill a case with one missed filing or one missed hearing.  The other side will use their arsenal of tricks to up-end your best laid plans, especially when it comes to beating you on civil procedure.

#5:

With judicial process, you at least get your day in court, yet most homeowners don’t take advantage of that because they’re too busy running scared. Now imagine being in the middle of a perceived pandemic and facing a banking tyrant and its attorney head-on when all you can think about is how to avoid a potential brush with death.

With a non-judicial process, locking horns with the lender in court is the only way you’re going to stop this kind of foreclosure because the lender has resorted to advertising and selling your property on the courthouse steps instead and if you’re like the author, you’d want your day in court and the only way to get it is to file a lawsuit against the servicer and any parties coming against you that have made themselves “relevant” parties.

One would at least want to find at least one defendant in-state.  This is how diversity jurisdiction is defeated because lenders will quickly remove cases to federal court because the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000 and the plaintiff lives in one state, while the defendant lives in another state.  In-state defendants could include: (a.) document manufacturing plant employees; (b.) local law firms bringing the foreclosure action; and (c.) lenders whose headquarters are domiciled in whatever state you are filing the action in.  This won’t work if the bank is just a branch of a main bank headquartered outside of your state.  Most people don’t sue the trustee, unless the trustee (named within the deed of trust or substituted into it using a Substitution of Trustee document that follows a bogus assignment).  Then … it’s open season on the trustee.  Attorneys will give you a lot of push back on this because they don’t like suing within their own profession nor do they especially like suing trustees.  The trustee  is supposed to be a neutral party; however, when they do something totally egregious, there is established case law in most states that can wield an axe in the form of liability.

Again, the biggest issue is picking a fight with the wrong party.  Generally, rampant emotions cause bad decision making and that is another fine line item that gets homeowners in trouble.  If you’re going to litigate, let logic replace emotion.  You’ll need logic along for the ride.  There’s plenty of time for celebration later when you’ve effectuated your “Plan B” all the while holding the lender at bay.

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THE REAL REASON THE REMIC WANTS YOUR HOUSE …

(OP – ED) — THE BIGGER LIE …

I wonder if you can actually put a figure to what you’ve been paying attorney(s) to defend your foreclosure, thinking the REMIC is just going to roll over and play dead and you’re going to get a free house.  I’ve got some startling news for you … news that has never been posted online by me before.

REMICs will not agree to a short sale!

It’s one thing if your property has seriously negative equity.  It’s quite another (these days) when it doesn’t matter what the foreclosure sale nets.  Why?

The REMICs want the foreclosure (and this comes straight from the REMIC’s attorneys mouths) is … wait for it …

If they accept a short sale, the Trustee (Administrator) of the REMIC has to pay the difference between what the property sells for and its face value (the value of the note).  If the Trustee forecloses, and the property sells for whatever, the investors who actually funded the REMIC “take it in the shorts”!   Thus … by foreclosing, the REMIC will not have to pay out any sums (or any of its profits) for losses incurred upon foreclosure.

Now you know why the REMICs want your home!  Now you know why it doesn’t matter what the securitization audit says or what claim you might have to the relationship between the REMIC and the Investors who funded it (and actually funded your loan).

We’re back to the dirty land record paper however … and this is why you need this workshop!   Not only do you need to learn HOW TO overcome the paper trail … and if you should even bother … you also need to know how to recover from foreclosure, because 9 times out of 10, the REMIC is going to win.  The REMIC will not let you do a short sale.  It has no incentive!

So what excuse are you going to give me for spending all that money getting that securitization audit done?  All of those little fancy boxes on the page are nothing more than …

Boilerplate Bullshit!

We can discover the same thing analyzing the chain of title.  The bottom line is … if the document contains false and misrepresentative information, there’s a right way and a wrong way to go about attacking it.  The bottom line is maximizing time and cash flow and homeowners who are being foreclosed on seem to think they have both when in fact (1) their days are numbered; and (2) they’ve been using the wrong mindset to overcome foreclosure.

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THE C&E, ASSIGNMENTS … AND YOUR RIGHT TO CHALLENGE THEM (PART 1) …

(OP-ED) — The author of this post is a consultant to attorneys on quiet title and cancellation and expungement actions and thus, not an attorney who can give legal advice.  This overview, with its suggestive commentary, is for your educational entertainment only. 

Scenario … “The Set-Up”

You want to buy a home.  You don’t have much money, but credit is plentiful, as long as you can “fog up a mirror”.  You’re the “party of the first part” because you’re willing to take a gamble that if you can get a loan, you’ll be able to pay it back, with interest.

However, you’re not “Party A” (the party of the second part).  Party A” is a corresponding lender. That means it’s highly likely your loan is going to be securitized, which means it’s going to be put into the MERS® System, which is now owned by the same company that owns the New York Stock Exchange.

But of course, you’re ignorant of all of the shenanigans going on behind the scenes because you just want the keys to the house.

Meet “Party B” … not Cardi B; Cardi B has lots of money and she can probably pay cash for a house).

Party B is more than likely the sponsor-seller (the interim funding lender in the deal).  Party B figured out how to make a puttload of money doing securitization, so Party B hooked up with some attorneys who all engaged in “pure intellectual masturbation” together to create a “sales pitch”, known to investors as a 424(b)(5) Prospectus.  This document was drafted and signed under penalty of perjury under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.  But that wouldn’t really matter to you, because you just wanted the keys to the house, right?

Meet “Party C” … the Depositor.  This entity is never a “member”, “user” or “subscriber” of the MERS® System; however, the Depositor plays an important role in securitization because it has to accumulate all of the documents (mortgages and notes funded by the REMIC) together by the specified “Cut-Off Date”, which is shown in the Prospectus (the sales pitch), which has to be done by a date certain (not 5 or 7 years down the road) or else the transfer of the loan into the REMIC would be void.  Party C is one of those parties that is a necessary party to securitization, so without it being named in the chain of transfers from Party A to Party B to Party C to “Party D” (the Trustee for the REMIC trust), as specified in the Prospectus, by the specified date, then it creates all sorts of legal challenges down the road, for both borrowers and investors alike.

To make even more money on the deal, Party B goes out and makes applications all over town for default insurance, while placing side bets (credit default swaps) on the performance of the certificates issued to the investors who have no idea what’s coming.

Now that all the side bets are in place and the loans have all been funded, the loan you got through Party A (the corresponding lender who only put up 5% of the deal) just closed and Party A got reimbursed by Party B, who actually funded the loan!

Later you find out the truth … but wait … if Party B was actually footing the bill with investor money it got through securitization, shouldn’t Party B be named the lender on the mortgage or deed of trust?  You’d think so.  But nope!  That puts Party B too close to the action on the assignment that’s supposed to be recorded in the land records where your house is … but somehow … Party B and its corresponding lenders are having too much fun giving loans to people they knew couldn’t repay them … so they forget about recording the required assignments altogether.

Ha! Ha! Ha!  Not!

The sponsor-seller knows what’s coming, because it’s holding all the Aces and it knows that over time … the house of cards will fall because all the loans in the pool are set to “reset” themselves within a certain period of time, causing the entire REMICs value to collapse.  I call it “Day 91”.  That’s the day the sponsor-seller gets to cash in on all of the insurance policies and credit default swaps.  The sponsor-seller can take a $500,000 loan and make $7.5-million off of the deal!

And here you are, swimming in debt, trying to figure out how to pay that mortgage that just reset itself through that adjustable rate BS you obligated yourself for.  But there’s more month at the end of the money.  You stop paying.  Party B is counting on it!  Party B set the whole thing up (using the MERS® System) to obfuscate the chain of title so it can create assignments of mortgage and deeds of trust to record in the land records vis a vis the mortgage loan servicer, who is tasked with taking your payment every month.

At least that’s what the mortgage loan servicer wants you to think when it sends you the default notice!  But alas … another lie.

The mortgage loan servicer is required to pay your principal and interest payments on your mortgage loan to the investors whether you pay them or not!   It’s called an “Advance”.  That too, is in the Prospectus … (not in the PSA)!   Simply put … are you really in default when the alleged REMIC moves to foreclose on you?   If someone is paying the investors every month, then how can they claim you’re in default.  Because they have a contract with you?   The originating lender (Party A) was paid off at closing by Party B (who used investor money to fund the loan) … this is what we call “table-funded lending”.

I’m trying to tell a story here, because this is the part where the rubber meets the road! 

Until you default (when the servicer declares you aren’t making your payments anymore) … you’ll never see an assignment recorded in the land records (99% of the time).  You have no contract with the servicer (Party E, for Empty Pockets).  Servicers have been known to “rob Peter’s account to pay Paul’s account” all the time, like Ocwen, which is why servicers are sloppy with handling money and shitty record-keeping.  But the servicer has another angle … it uses its employees to create assignments of mortgage and deeds of trust using MERS to cover up the missing links in the chain of title and conveys the title from Party A to Party D, without any recollection or mention of Parties B or C!   So who is it really coming into court to foreclose?

If you said Party E, you’re right!   These days, servicers are being even more brash, claiming they have a power of attorney from Party D (the Trustee for the REMIC) to foreclose on behalf of Certificateholders of some REMIC “series number”, claiming the certificate holders have been “harmed”, when in fact, the servicer is just trying to reimburse itself for all the defaulted payments it kept making on your behalf.   Now it’s using phony documentation to claim the note and mortgage were transferred to Party D, many years later.  The REMICs only stay open a year, so none of that makes any sense.  So the mortgage loan servicer retains the law firm to foreclose on your house … let the lying, cheating and stealing begin!   All on behalf of Party F (the investors).  I use Party “F” because in this scenario, the investors get “F**ked” in the end because the money made by stealing your house using phony assignments created by the mortgage loan servicer and its employees goes into their pockets and not those of the investors.

The attorneys continue the lie by claiming you’re not a third-party beneficiary to the assignment!   

And the judges buy into that crap hook, line and sinker!  It shows their ignorance! 

There are a lot of problems with these foreclosure mill lawyers using that falsehood.  In fact, the very pleadings or responses they file in lawsuits brought by the homeowner in deed of trust states to stop the foreclosure, or in the pleadings they put into the court record in mortgage states, contain misstatements in of themselves … and even more so when they have to rely on the recorded documents that the mortgage loan servicers put into the land records, in violation of statutes and penal codes, that contain false and misrepresentative information.

And the borrower and the attorney for the borrower run into court and wave the assignment around, telling the judge it’s a fraudulent document.  The judge of course (after hearing the attorney say you can’t challenge the assignment because you’re not a third-party beneficiary to the assignment) goes along with the bank’s argument … just because it seems to make sense.  However, there is a problem with that scenario.

Check back for PART 2 … where we discuss the bank’s flawed argument … and what homeowners are countering that flawed argument with!

HINT: Are the investors really third-party beneficiaries?  (think about it seriously, really).

Why should that affect you?

Look at your assignment!

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DEFEATING DIVERSITY IN FORECLOSURE ACTIONS

(BREAKING NEWS — OP-ED) — The author of this post is the author of Clouded Titles, The Quiet Title War Manual, The C & E on Steroids!, The FDCPA, Debt Collection & Foreclosures, The Credit Restoration Primer, End Game Strategies, Beyond End Game Strategies and host of The Krieger Files.  The opinions expressed herein are that of the author and should not be construed as legal advice.  For legal advice, seek competent counsel that clearly understands what constitutes diversity jurisdiction.

Even in its most liberal stature, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has again, redefined and re-explained that REMIC trusts can end up costing you lots of money in litigation, fighting a losing battle in federal court by re-constituting an opinion of what constitutes diversity jurisdiction.  See the link below to the 17-page ruling:

Demarest v HSBC Bank USA NA, 9th App Cir No 17-56432 (Apr 8, 2019)

You’ll readily notice in the caption on Page 1 that HSBC and MERS were “incorrectly sued”, which would indicate to me they were sued in the wrong name, as indicated in the caption.

Part of the problem here is that the trustee was also sued (Western Progressive, LLC) and the trustee was also out-of-state as to its “headquarters”, which put all of the Defendants, coupled with the $75,000 required for complete diversity jurisdiction, squarely in federal court.

Again, Hawaii Attorney Gary Victor Dubin, who is again in the crosshairs of the Hawaii Bar (thanks to the banks and their attorneys who don’t like lawyers who beat them in court), likens being in federal court to suicide, which he has succinctly stated that it (suicide) is better than being in federal court.  Yet, a lot of people end up becoming victims within the federal system because of improper and incomplete pleadings.   Couple that with WHO you sue and the numbers of removed cases rise exponentially.

Why sue MERS?

This entity is the “bastard child” of MERSCORP Holdings, Inc., which is now owned by Intercontinental Exchange, Inc. (which also owns the New York Stock Exchange).  This newly-acquired entity has the backing of Wall Street.  The ownership of MERS may have changed, but the stupidity of the courts in relying on every tenet of MERS’s flawed business model incorporated within the “MERS® System”, has caused nothing but utter conflict among the state courts and federal circuit courts.

Like MERS says or intimates in its pleadings (among some of the third-person, schizophrenic quotations from its collective counsel and others), “We didn’t do anything wrong!”  “We want to be all things to all people!”  “We are the God of Securitization!”  (sic)  “We are everyone’s beneficiary that names us in their mortgages and deeds of trust!”  “We can be a nominee (agent) and beneficiary at the same time!”  “We can do anything we want, because we’re MERS!”  “We can remove you to federal court because we know your pleadings lack sufficiency and we can get them dismissed!”  “We can be in multiple states at any given moment and the federal judges will do what we say because we own them!” (that’s what they think, seriously).

Knowing you’re dealing with such a filthy, stinking rich entity that kowtows to Wall Street, why in bloody hell would you name them in anything?  Do you seriously have deep pockets?

You’re dealing with a multi-billion-dollar-a-year company here.   Here are some facts you should face:

  1. You signed the mortgage (or deed of trust).  No one held a gun to your head.  You could have walked away from the closing, but you didn’t.
  2. You could have read the entire agreement, asked questions; and when you didn’t get sufficient answers, you could have put off the closing until you got clarification, but you didn’t.
  3. You had no idea that the closing agent and the entity that agent represented knew (or should have known) WHERE the funds were coming from; how the funds were getting to the escrow account that was wiring your funds to the closing agent; and all of the details regarding the validity of the “lender” and “mortgagee of record”.
  4. You had no idea what the acronym “MIN” meant … nor had you any idea of the 18-digit number following that acronym.
  5. You had no idea your loan was being securitized through a Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) on Wall Street.
  6. You had no idea that your home loan was being funded by investors unknown to you.

Yet, you got hoodwinked into signing your life away to a life of potential PTFD (Post-Traumatic Foreclosure Disorder), should you fail to make your monthly mortgage payments!

What constitutes diversity jurisdiction?

In order to be able to remove a lawsuit to federal court (which is a court of limited jurisdiction), two things have to occur:

  1. The Plaintiff is a resident of State “A”, while the Defendant(s) are known to be residents of State “B”.
  2. The amount in controversy must exceed $75,000.

Gee … I wonder what would happen if the homeowner showed the caption as:

Joan Demarest and the Registered Holders of Nomura Home Equity Loan, Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-HE2 … as joint petitioners … with NO defendants listed … and asked for a declaratory judgment ruling on the merits of WHO got screwed in this deal?  Where’s the controversy then?  (you attorneys can chime in here)

In order to have justiciable controversy (the makings of a proper lawsuit that a court can claim jurisdiction to rule on), you have to have a Plaintiff and a Defendant(s).  If you have “joint petitioners” and NO defendants, how can there be a “controversy” if both joint petitioners agree on the same thing?  Despite the fact that the certificate holders are from all over the world, some of them (To Be Determined) may be in the state you’re residing in (State “A”).   If there’s no State “B”, then why list DOES 1-10, inclusive, like this case did?    I actually litigated a case (while out of state) through the mail, with a co-party, as joint petitioners, and got my ruling from a court in Missouri!  Does that surprise you?

Diversity FAILS if … 

  1. There is no amount in controversy (which is what you have in a declaratory relief case, like a cancellation and expungement action (C&E) over a bogus document in the land records; and
  2. You aren’t naming out-of-state defendants until the in-state defendants respond and lock the case up in state court.

Does this make any legal sense to you?

This is part of what we taught in the C&E Workshop in Las Vegas April 6th and 7th. 

America’s land records are a “crime scene”!

MERS’s flawed business model helped make it that way.  Over 80-million homeowners who unknowingly borrowed investor money through securitized mortgages did the rest of the damage.  It was “intentional” on MERS’s part.   It was ‘unintentional” on the homeowners’ part.

Despite the fact you can beat diversity, certain entities will remove the case to federal court anyway, just to F**K with you and your pocketbook!  MERS is one of those entities.

There is a right way and a wrong way to approach this scenario.  What Joan Demarest did in her case was the wrong way.

The “trustee” is a necessary party in Deed of Trust states!

You should know that if you name the trustee in your lawsuit, it’s likely that the trustee is “headquartered” out-of-state.   The trustee (in this case) was declared by the 9th Circuit panel to be a “real party to the controversy for purposes of diversity jurisdiction when he possess certain customary powers to hold, manage, and dispose of assets for the benefit of others”.

This case was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court on May 27, 2016.  You would think that by then, anyone involved in this case could have figured out what the “end result” could be … but NO!  We have attorneys out there that like to use the “shotgun approach” instead of the “sniper approach”.  This is why California Attorney Al West and I put together “The C & E on Steroids!”   It’s a sniper approach to cleaning up the “crime scene”.   If you clean up the “crime scene”, then what evidence is there that a crime occurred?  What evidence is there that a party has standing to foreclose when the intended “consequence” of an assignment is declared void, cancelled and expunged from the land records?

This is why we found instructional appellate case law to support our research and methodology for doing these types of “sniper approach” end game strategies.  Everyone wants an “end game”.  Getting to that point is why people run into trouble having their dirty laundry removed to federal court where it’s likely to get dismissed on a 12(b)(6) motion.  And the foreclosure happens anyway, because “we’re too pissed to think straight!”

Watch the movie “American Sniper”.  Then, liken that mindset to your approach.  Knowing WHEN, WHERE, HOW and WHY you need to “take out” a target makes all the difference in the world.

Look for The C & E on Steroids!, along with the DVD training video kit, available in early May, only on CloudedTitles.com!

Sniper training at your fingertips!

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STRIKE TWO AGAINST OCWEN’S “QUALIFIED WITNESS”; SAY ALOHA OCWEN!

BREAKING NEWS, OP-ED … 

(Honolulu, HI) — For those of you looking for ammunition against Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits (REMICs) and the servicers and subservicers who screw homeowners on their behalf, a new case out of Hawaii has surfaced that should put more securitization and civil procedure into greater detail, courtesy of foreclosure defense attorney Gary Victor Dubin.  You can download the .pdf of the Hawaii Supreme Court ruling here:

US Bank NA v Mattos, Sup Ct HI No SCWC-14-0001134 (Jun 6, 2017)

For those of you battling against U.S. Bank, NA as a Trustee of a REMIC, you should know that U.S. Bank has admitted in a 4-page brochure that they do NOT know when a Borrower is in default:

US Bank Brochure – Role of the Corporate Trustee

Further, U. S. Bank (in the same brochure) admits that the Borrower is in fact a part of the securitization chain!

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, long before the Glass-Stegall Act was repealed in 1999, issued a Comptroller’s Handbook on Asset Securitization that also stated the Borrower was a party to the securitization chain (see Page 8 of 92), contemplating in advance of how the chain actually was supposed to work:

OCC Asset Securitization Handbook

Ocwen, as you may recall, admitted to the United States Government (via 6 different federal agencies) in writing that when Borrowers don’t make their payments (to the REMIC), Ocwen, as servicer through the Sales and Servicing Agreement, makes their payment for them, in an article I just posted, see page 2 (bottom) and 3 (top) of  EXHIBIT 29

The Hawaii Supreme Court reversed an appellate court ruling, which upheld the district court’s ruling that U.S. Bank, as Trustee of a REMIC, had the right to foreclose on a property belonging to a Hawaii property owner, which other courts across the land have dared to lightly tread upon these same similar issues. Sadly, borrowers seldom ever follow through on getting to the nation’s highest courts (the state Supreme Courts) to achieve finality.

I beg of you to read Gary Dubin’s case, because part of the equation in securitization failure has been examined and ruled upon by a state Supreme Court (Hawaii).  I am singularly surprised that other state’s haven’t made the same glaring rulings finitely (Florida’s 4th DCA is close, but NOT THIS CIGAR!).

This case is a rarity that should be examined in more detail because the Pooling and Servicing Agreement (“PSA”) was included in the attack.  What’s worse, Ocwen’s “Contract” witness, who tendered an affidavit claiming he was a “know-it-all” about Ocwen’s business records (which 20 states and the District of Columbia are calling a sham), which did nothing for U.S. Bank because U.S. Bank’s attorneys couldn’t prove the relationship between Ocwen and U.S. Bank.

I was truly shocked about the part of robo-signing, which in fact was mentioned in the ruling.  No one has yet to challenge this act as part of a civil conspiracy (yet); however, this is to come.  I am not going to go into detail for you here, because I know many of you out there like to do your own research into the elements of civil conspiracy in your respective states, as in a Google search, “What constitutes the elements of civil conspiracy in _____ (insert your state here)____?” and see what pops up.  The burden of proof is much lower than RICO and easier to prove by attacking the signers, witnesses and notary involved in the assignment.

Oh, darn! This involves spending money doing depositions, huh? Shit!  And here you thought you were going to get a “free house”!  I don’t know where the bank’s attorneys get off making these snide remarks about homeowners wanting a free house, because they don’t even know what the homeowners are thinking.

The Trustee hasn’t paid a nickel to the investors that it can document; however, EXHIBIT 29 clearly identifies WHO pays the investors.  So, taking this to its logical conclusion: If the investors are getting paid, then how can the Trustee, on behalf of the investors, claim the investors have been harmed or prejudiced because the securitization chain failed?  I have no contract with the servicer, do I?  My contract is the Mortgage and Note. Those contracts are with the Lender.  When the Lender goes belly up, as history has shown us, the mortgage servicers use the MERS® System to “keep the lie going” by giving unproven authority to thousands of writer’s cramped individuals who execute assignments in its name, being told by third-party document mill executives that it’s perfectly legal to do what they’re doing.

This is why the entire banking underbelly is corrupt and illegal as hell.

The securitization chain failed because the parties to the trust DID NOT follow the REMIC’s own governing regulations, not because the investors weren’t getting their payments!  When push came to shove, Ocwen and other third-party butt plugs had to gum up the chain of title with what I consider falsified documents, Assignments of Mortgages and Assignments of Deeds of Trust.  That is my new term for document mill robo-signers who have no knowledge of the facts contained in an assignment they’re claiming they have knowledge of! To even proffer this … and then brag about it like NTC does (the McDonald’s of robo-signing, “over 16-million served”, referring to the number of documents this third-party document mill says it’s recorded as a means to “clear title”) … should have put this entity, its directors and employees, in prison.  However, since the banks have virtually paid off the state legislators and executive enforcement arms … no one has gone to prison, yet.

A Court Case Full of Surprises! 

I am glowing about the securitization/forensic analysis included as a mention in this Hawaii case as a means to educate a judge … and nothing more.  Most judges can’t wrap their heads around this kind of testimony because they are only thinking about their retirement accounts and how those accounts might be affected if they rule against the bank.  Unfortunately, what they DON’T GET … it that the entire 424(b)(5) prospectus is in play here, NOT just the PSA portion of it!  Let’s take a look, shall we?

SEC Info – Mortgage Asset Securitization Transactions Inc – ‘424B5_ on 1:14:05 re: Mastr Alternative

There are 357 pages in the Prospectus attached above.  Yes, the WHOLE enchilada!  Why just pick out the PSA?  That’s like eating the peas and leaving the steak! It doesn’t contain ALL of the information now, does it?  This is the Prospectus for the foregoing Hawaii case! 

Look at the portion of the Prospectus that talks about the PSA.  If you look under the TABLE OF CONTENTS, the Pooling and Servicing Agreement is found beginning at Page S-95.  However, the cut-off and closing dates that are related to the issues expressed within the Pooling and Servicing Agreement are found OUTSIDE OF the section on the PSA, at Page S-5, 90 pages away from the PSA!  The Prospectus of this REMIC (and any REMIC for that matter) is the entire “sales pitch” of the REMIC!  It’s the entire set of governing relations for the REMIC!  Why then are we just focusing on the PSA when the entire 424(b)(5) Prospectus has all the rest of the nuggets that make the PSA make sense?   Because judges are lazy and don’t want to read 357 pages of this stuff.  If judges figured this out, there wouldn’t be one retirement plan vested in RMBS’s and CMBS’s!

This is the end result of what the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act has caused.  This is the lazy man’s excuse for not wanting to read (texting is more funner, sic).  This is why Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s reintroduction of the Act cannot go unsupported.  The people need relief here.

Text – S.881 – 115th Congress (2017-2018): 21st Century Glass-Steagall Act of 2017 | Congress.gov |

I have talked about securitization failure systematically on this blog prior to the mass deletion of what came before this set of recently-posted articles.  It would make no sense to educate a judge that thinks his retirement account will fail if he rules against a bank.  This is why I have always told consumers involved in foreclosure litigation to “background their judge” (hire a private investigator if you have to, to dig up the judge’s nasty little political secrets)!

What has happened since the Glass-Steagall Act was repealed has turned into an all-out war involving servicer fraud and this case is a clear example of it.  I seriously doubt that U.S. Bank was really involved in this case (more like Ocwen).  If the attorneys for the bank were actually forced to admit WHICH aggrieved party they were representing in this case, they probably couldn’t tell you.  My guess is, Ocwen retained them because Ocwen wants to steal your house to reimburse itself for all those pesky servicing fees it racked up paying the REMICs off!  This is how Ocwen wants to get rich off America … and it uses Altisource and REALServicing (more-than-arm’s-length devices) to pull it off!  Any time that you see “corporate layering”, you are going to have to dig deep like many of the readers of this blog do … and pull up the serious stuff that matters.

We have to be smarter than the banks if we want to win.  Unlike the banks, we have to expose the truth!

This is my truth: OSCEOLA COUNTY FORENSIC EXAMINATION

 

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