Tag Archives: limited powers of attorney

FDCPA CAN STILL APPLY TO NON-JUDICIAL FORECLOSURES!

(OP-ED) — The author of this post is the author of The FDCPA, Debt Collection and Foreclosures … and posits the following for educational purposes and for your consideration in the paradigm shift that has now become the focus of thousands of consumers.

I’ve noticed an uptick in the number of pro-bank/pro-debt collector law firm postings regarding the U.S. Supreme Court’s latest narrow ruling in the Obduskey case (out of the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals).  I love how these folks like to “pat themselves on the back” for their observations that non-judicial foreclosure proceedings can still be business as usual, despite the caveats their posts now contain.  Why on earth would they post “caveats” to the debt collection industry (which includes law firms like the one Dennis Obduskey filed an FDCPA action against) if they were so sure of themselves in being able to just walk all over borrowers they claim are in default?

Despite the fact the nation’s highest court resolved the federal circuit split on whether non-judicial foreclosures can continue as “business as usual”, the ruling was “narrow in scope” regarding the enforcement of security interests as defined under 15 USC § 1692f(6), which is what the Court focused on in its decision: Obduskey v McCarthy & Holthus LLP, 586 U.S. ___ (2019)

What Congress intended … 

Creditors used to love the idea that they could open up a can of “whoop ass” on debtors any time they felt like it, even late-night, repetitive or threatening phone calls (“I know where you live” and “your mommy’s going to jail” and “we’re going to sue you if you don’t pay” or “we’re going to bomb your office building if you don’t come down here and pay this bill” or “you !@)#(%^!”.)  The caveats I’m seeing in these law blog posts still make reference to the fact that the latest FDCPA-related ruling DOESN’T mean “business as usual”.  It simply means that debt collectors trying to enforce deeds of trusts have to be extra careful NOT to step over that well-defined line of intended “abuses” that do in fact, fall under the FDCPA!

Enforcing a recorded security interest (deed of trust, security deed, HELOC, etc.) in a non-judicial state means just that.  If a third party (the trustee, NOT MERS) intends on using the terms of the security instrument to act as the third party in taking back collateral, the collection activity has to specifically and purely involve that process.  The narrow ruling still prohibits abusive debt collection practices, whether or not a non-judicial foreclosure is still the intended outcome.  The abusive debt collection practices fall under 15 USC 1692d and 15 USC 1692e, as well as portions of 15 USC 1692f (1) through (5) and (6)(B)(C) and (7) and (8).  See here for clarification: FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT 09-1996

If you have a case … you have a case … 

Every time the debt collection industry scores a narrow victory, they pontificate their accomplishments as soon as humanly possible, almost to the point of bragging rights (see, I told you so … lemme rub your nose in it) kind of stuff.  This is typical of the legal profession, especially the kind that can operate unchecked when it comes to carrying out enforcement actions.

One of the more remarkable things I find is that all non-judicial foreclosures are assumed to be legal unless otherwise challenged.  One of the things I put forward in the book (mentioned above) is that careful analysis of the debt collection laws needs to be strictly adhered to (the letter of the law), which you are attempting to assert was violated.

How the “chain of title” points to potential suspect violations of 15 USC 1692e(5) … 

Here’s where the latest ammo we’ve been sharing on the C&E comes into play.  Cancellation and expungement (C&E) actions are used to disable and destroy the authority these debt collectors rely on to even enforce a security instrument.  Under “False or misleading representations” (§ 807 of the FDCPA), section 5 prohibits false, deceptive or misleading representation in threatening “to take any action that cannot legally be taken” … which would mean to me that if you could strip away the lies contained within the assignments that generally precede the initiation of a non-judicial foreclosure action through a C&E, the authority of the debt collector would be void and the debt collector’s representations would then be false and misleading, which IS a violation of the FDCPA!

Champagne budget … Beer Belly Pocketbook! 

A C&E action is definitely a cheaper way to wage war on an unsuspecting servicer (who is really behind the scenes of the debt collection/non-judicial enforcement proceeding), stripping away whatever rights it thinks it has to steal your house on behalf of party or parties unknown (which could be Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, lest we hold the GSEs unaccountable in the end) than waging an all-out FDCPA battle in federal court, which costs substantially more money.  Try to keep the emotions in check for the moment while I finish.

The document the servicers are creating is the assignment of deed of trust (much like the assignment of mortgage), which they claim gives them the authority (on behalf of the alleged “lender”) to appoint a substitute trustee to initiate a non-judicial foreclosure.  Do you have a contract with the mortgage loan servicer?   (Didn’t think so.)  However, servicers have Limited Powers of Attorney, which they claim give them the authority to do whatever they want, including wading into the shark-infested waters of violations created under the FDCPA.  Strip away their authority under the assignment as void … they’re like “chum in the water”.

This is why I’m releasing a two-day training video DVD set with the latest book by attorney Al West and myself, The C&E on Steroids! in very short order.  What better a way to deal with America’s tainted real property records than to fight the good fight head-on in state court, rather than wage a flimsy, unsupported war in federal court without first demonstrating the ultra vires behavior of the trustee thanks to a phony assignment, which you’ve knocked out FIRST in a C&E action!

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UPDATE: BRUCE JACOBS IS FIGHTING BANK OF AMERICA!

UPDATE FROM MIAMI —

Miami-Dade Judge Bronwyn Miller has rejected attorney Bruce Jacobs’ demands that Bank of America be sanctioned for withholding and destroying records … 1.8-billion of them!  There was no specific reason given for the Judge’s decision.  Bank of America (of course) argues that Jacobs’ claims were baseless.

Jacobs had accused the bank of purging the records while under a court-ordered subpoena (in another foreclosure case) to hide evidence of alleged fraud because the original records may have been altered.  Bank of America responded by stating that the records were copied by an outside firm and returned to the bank and that it was the “outside firm’s copies that were purged”.  Bank of America’s attorney stated that Jacobs’ claims were not relevant to this matter because they were based on claims from another case raised in bankruptcy court.  (See the article below for clarification!)

 

See the following link:

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/11/bank-of-america-fights-court-battle-over-purge-of-nearly-2-billion-bank-records.html

NOTE:  Bruce has asked me to repost this!

OP-ED — It is not surprising that the individual documents involved in the particular case are not a part of the scrutiny involved here.  Anyone reading any “manufactured” Bank of America document could understand that in (for a time) in Simi Valley, California, tens of thousands of so-called fraudulent assignments of both mortgages and deeds of trust were created under the direction of Bank of America in order to create standing so it could foreclose on affected homeowners.  Many of these documents contained “CoreLogic” on them.  We know from a certain interview with a former contract worker at Simi Valley (in the document manufacturing plant there) that he was signing documents as a Vice President of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. and he didn’t even know who MERS was.  Documents were always referenced back to CoreLogic in Chapin, South Carolina.  Remember the LPS debacle?

Title companies and document processing plants that go out of their way to create documents (or be involved in the creation of them) are NOT your friend!

Many of these documents claim that Bank of America, NA ended up with (as an assignee, or transferred to another party as an assignor) an assignment of mortgage or deed of trust as the result of a merger involving “BAC Home Loans Servicing LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP”, which we have researched thoroughly and found to be false, as Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. was not directly subsumed into Bank of America, N.A.   Oops!  We forgot Red Oak Capital and another merger entity.  The point being … if the other side is going to claim that it acquired something by merger … don’t you think it’s necessary to make them prove it?   We take too much of this for granted and don’t recognize when something is that obvious that we “forget” to challenge it. Every state in the U.S. has a civil component for attacking fraudulent documents.  Why is no one using them to their fullest extent?

Of the documents we now find worthy of discovery: (a.) all assignments in the chain of title; (b.) limited powers of attorney recorded for the benefit of the assignee (Grantee); and (c.) agency and/or merger agreements.  The Grantee (or Assignee) of an agency relationship cannot prove that relationship.  It must be legally proven by the Grantor (or Assignor) of the relationship!  For example … how can a Borrower “agree” that an agency relationship between Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. exists on a mortgage or deed of trust when the Borrower has no proof or personal knowledge of such?

This is why homeowners should regard anything involving “MERS” as suspect and (as we suggest) … walk away from the closing table!  It’s bad enough that over 80-million homes have issues involving their chains of title because of MERS and yet people keep going to the closing table and signing these documents without reading them because they just want the damned keys to the house, whether it financially and psychologically affects them in the future!

This is why we see increased bankruptcy filings, suicides and murder-suicides related to foreclosure cases all over America!  There are portfolio lenders (like fsnb.com) out there … why aren’t we using them instead?   And now another round of subprime mortgages has hit the national marketplace and people who got into trouble in Round One are the first ones standing in line for Round Two.  When will we learn that those who are ignorant of history are condemned to repeat it?

In my next post, I’m going to present a 5th U.S. Circuit case where a REMIC won because of a homeowner’s failure to properly attack his case!  This case involves not one but TWO Assignments of Deed of Trust that were not only servicer “manufactured” but recorded in “reverse”, which would appear to have negated the effectiveness of BOTH of them!  You be the judge!

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