Tag Archives: COTA Workshop

2020 FORECLOSURES BACK IN FULL SWING!

(BREAKING NEWS, OP-ED) — The author of this post carefully posits this article for your educational benefit and any information shared here should not be construed to be legal advice. 

Anyone familiar with this online blog is probably fully well aware that the content shared on this site has a lot of legal undertones, so much so, that many people are apt to misinterpret what’s being said in reality, replacing their thought processes with directives shared as “suggestions” on this site (hence the need for the disclaimer).

The state bar associations are starting to find themselves in a real dilemma.  Three states (Washington, Utah and Arizona) have already initiated non-lawyer “paraprofessional” objectives to allow more folks to have access to the justice system.  This comes at a time when eviction moratoriums have pretty much been lifted and the “man behind the curtain” jumps out and reveals himself  in the form of service of process.

This author is getting closer to deciding a date for when another Foreclosure Defense 101 class should be held.  Of course, with no one willing to fly anywhere, this will probably be held online in webinar format, where you get to ask questions via the chat box.

The thing about foreclosures … statistically, 97% or better of those receiving service of process (notice from the bank via physical delivery via a knock on the door, certified mail, notice of publication, door hanger, etc.) will ultimately decide to pack their belongings and bug out, if what happened after the 2008 financial collapse is any indication.  Maybe we have more liquidity than we did before, maybe we don’t.  If we don’t have the resources to fight, it’s because we’re fighting the urge to resist identifying where those resources are.  The author describes those resources more fully in his book Clouded Titles.

If there was a way you could fight a foreclosure and stay in your home for over two years, would the information in a webinar workshop be worth it to you to have in your arsenal of legal tools?

Then … prepare yourself for the fight (not of your life) that generally sickens most people.  Prepare yourself mentally NOT to do stupid stuff (like give in so quickly).

The legal system has provided us with so many stall tactics (NO! Bankruptcy is NOT one of them!) it’s a wonder more people haven’t stopped to “catch on”.  They just want off the merry-go-round because that’s pretty much what you’ll feel like you’re on when you engage in fighting the foreclosure; however, the merry-go-round is not spinning at 3 miles an hour … it’s spinning at more like 60 miles an hour!  The closer you get to your court date, the faster the merry-go-round speeds up.

If you’ve ever been to a “rocket docket”, like this author has multiple times … it’s a scary thought … watching a judge clear a courtroom of homeowners being foreclosed on in 3 hours or less (just in time for lunch), with their actual case hearings lasting two minutes or less.  It’s amazing how many homeowners complain that they have no access to “justice” when in fact, the legal system has never been more “giving”.  The information highway is chuck full of data if you know where to look.

Planning Your Strategy … in 5 steps! 

#1:

Remember the Harry Potter movie where Hagrid (while strolling down Diagon Alley) tells Harry, “If you know where to go …”?   Half your battle is in research.  If you don’t check your chain of title, you’ll end up choking your chicken in frustration.  (The author doesn’t mince words here.)  This is THE MOST important point in the entire schematic of foreclosure defense, especially when it comes to playing the delay game and playing it well.  If you don’t understand the chain of title, the author’s website offers a COTA Workshop that you can get via download in (4) 4-hour sessions and listen, watch and study what’s necessary to get through from Point A to Point B.

Once you’ve looked at your chain of title, the next fundamental issue in your quest to research details is getting at the truth.  The “truth” the way banks see things and the way YOU should see things all has to do with perception of what the documents in your chain of title say.  The chain of title is like an electric schematic, which tells you HOW things are connected in the series of conveyances, claims of lien and security instruments, which are designed as the hinge pin in claiming ownership of your collateral (your home).  Once you understand how all of this is postured, it makes things a lot clearer in your understanding of HOW to proceed.

#2:

Get copies of every document in the chain of title and examine each one that is relevant to your current situation, especially the assignments (of mortgage or deed of trust).  These little minuscule pages are where the devil is in the details.  A single-page assignment that contains all sorts of false and misrepresentative statements can be the bank’s undoing, at least in the short term.  Filing a quiet title action is NOT what you’re going to pursue in your research.  You’re not ready for that yet.

History has taught us that anyone running into court trying to quiet their title when it’s littered with all sorts of bullshit assignments is not only a big waste of your time and the court’s time, your foreclosure mill attorney will immediately pick up on your strategy and counterpunch you with motions to dismiss.  Quiet title works when there’s nothing left in the chain of title other than a lingering deed of trust or mortgage that’s not connected to anyone and the originating lender is defunct and can’t be found.  The idea here is to attack the assignments head on through a C & E action.  C & E is an acronym for Cancellation and Expungement action, which means you’re filing a declaratory relief action wherein you’re asking the court to examine a document for false statements and to cancel the document and order the clerk or recorder to remove the document completely from the land records in your county so the document has no legal force and effect against your property any longer.   This is what Al West and I developed into a workshop called The C & E on Steroids!, also available in DVD video/book combo form!  There’s nearly 14 hours of really good educational information packed into this kit.  This is the ammo one would use to fight those pesky assignments.  Here’s an idea! Once you’ve done it, make your investment back by helping others achieve success in this realm.

#3:

Knowing where to find the petitions and responsive pleadings is your next research step. There are websites that are devoted to supplying this kind of information if you don’t have time to wait for a pleadings and procedures book for your specific state. You can find these types of books in law libraries and they aren’t voluminous and most of them are self-explanatory.  It’s easy to simply make copies from the book on the pleadings you need (or buy the book online from a legal bookstore).  This author has spend hundreds of hours in the law library “chasing cases” because foreclosure mill attorneys are famous for throwing them around in their pleadings in an attempt to make their point tot the court about how they’re right and you’re wrong.  Many times however, these attorneys throw cases in there that are NOT applicable at all to the scenario you’re dealing with and you have every opportunity to thwart their moves (like one big, giant chess match).

Foreclosure mill lawyers have their own set of schematics too.  They know them well, like a flow chart of procedures.  This is what they get paid for … to execute on that flow chart every time they get a case.  They eat, breathe and shit this stuff on a daily basis and thus, THAT mindset is what you’re up against when you face these shysters in court.  You have the right to be treated as an equal by the court if you can’t afford representation, which means if the attorney says you want a “free house”, you get to stand up, object on the grounds that, “My worthy opponent is at his best when not inhibited by the facts, your Honor!”  In other words, you just matched wits with this lawyer by eloquently calling him a goddamned liar!

This is where research will help you become equally prepared to challenge his or her legal acumen because they will use every dirty trick in the book (like they’ve used on other unsuspecting victims of foreclosure). Facing off in court is not for the faint of heart either … and neither is being unprepared for the battle for the judge’s mind.

#4:

Framing your arguments is probably the biggest mess that a homeowner (or their attorney) can create, especially when it comes to beer belly budgets.  Most attorneys went to law school and learned what California attorney Al West calls, the “shotgun approach”.  This means (in short) … sue as many people as you can for everything under the sun and see what sticks.  Unfortunately, what most pissed-off homeowners don’t realize is that naming multiple defendants costs money: (a.) in developing the case against each defendant and the allegations against them; (b.) in the time it takes to complete the pleadings preparation; (c.) in filing and servicing costs ($300-$400 in filing fees and $60.00 per defendant served); (d.) in responsive pleadings to each defendant (after they file their answer to your complaint); and (e.) case management.  Each defendant will cost an average of $3,000 in legal fees, not counting discovery (via a deposition) which adds another $3,000 in approximate costs for each defendant deposed.  To make the math more simple, let’s say you have an attorney that wants to sue 5 defendants and wants advance testimony from each of them. Without even batting an eye, you’re up to roughly $30,700 and the judge hasn’t even reviewed your case yet.  Until you start evaluating your arguments, you have no idea what a lawsuit (or counterclaim) against a foreclosure is going to cost you.

While an answer to a judicial action can be a simple process, compulsory counterclaims aren’t.  If you’re trying to buy time, filing an answer in a judicial proceeding will buy you an average of 60 days, or until a court date is set and you get notice of it.

And all of the arguments in the world won’t help if you can’t keep track of timelines.  One of the biggest mistakes pro se litigants make is not keeping an eye on the court docket once a foreclosure proceeding has been commenced and the battle begins.  Not keeping track of the timelines and what the Rules of Civil Procedure mandates you must do in order to stay in the game successfully can kill a case with one missed filing or one missed hearing.  The other side will use their arsenal of tricks to up-end your best laid plans, especially when it comes to beating you on civil procedure.

#5:

With judicial process, you at least get your day in court, yet most homeowners don’t take advantage of that because they’re too busy running scared. Now imagine being in the middle of a perceived pandemic and facing a banking tyrant and its attorney head-on when all you can think about is how to avoid a potential brush with death.

With a non-judicial process, locking horns with the lender in court is the only way you’re going to stop this kind of foreclosure because the lender has resorted to advertising and selling your property on the courthouse steps instead and if you’re like the author, you’d want your day in court and the only way to get it is to file a lawsuit against the servicer and any parties coming against you that have made themselves “relevant” parties.

One would at least want to find at least one defendant in-state.  This is how diversity jurisdiction is defeated because lenders will quickly remove cases to federal court because the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000 and the plaintiff lives in one state, while the defendant lives in another state.  In-state defendants could include: (a.) document manufacturing plant employees; (b.) local law firms bringing the foreclosure action; and (c.) lenders whose headquarters are domiciled in whatever state you are filing the action in.  This won’t work if the bank is just a branch of a main bank headquartered outside of your state.  Most people don’t sue the trustee, unless the trustee (named within the deed of trust or substituted into it using a Substitution of Trustee document that follows a bogus assignment).  Then … it’s open season on the trustee.  Attorneys will give you a lot of push back on this because they don’t like suing within their own profession nor do they especially like suing trustees.  The trustee  is supposed to be a neutral party; however, when they do something totally egregious, there is established case law in most states that can wield an axe in the form of liability.

Again, the biggest issue is picking a fight with the wrong party.  Generally, rampant emotions cause bad decision making and that is another fine line item that gets homeowners in trouble.  If you’re going to litigate, let logic replace emotion.  You’ll need logic along for the ride.  There’s plenty of time for celebration later when you’ve effectuated your “Plan B” all the while holding the lender at bay.

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WHY IT PAYS TO CHECK THE WHOLE CHAIN OF TITLE!

(BREAKING NEWS – OP-ED) — The author of this post is providing the following case for your review to prove his point (not legal advice).  Take the educational value for what it is when you don’t do your due diligence! 

1601 Bay LLC et al v Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB et al, 3D19-492 (Nov 20, 2019)

This is one of the reasons I decided to offer an online Chain Of Title Assessment (COTA) class in the near future, so you can take advantage of not having to travel distances to participate in (8) 2-hour sessions to learn how these assessments are conducted and utilized.  These are not for foreclosure defense use (as an exhibit) … only for case development.

We are still in the midst of a foreclosure crisis.  It’s all due to the blowback of issues like what’s been described in this case.  It’s not hard to understand.  If you don’t look at the entire chain of title (and don’t expect your title company to do this for you) as an investor or future homeowner, you deserve what you get.

I’m going to be brief about this because you’ve heard me “beat the drum” now for how many years?  Many of you have scoffed at my pontifications.  Some of you have taken it to heart.  The mega-banks are worthless when it comes to fair and honest dealing, yet consumers are still flocking to them for loans, which they are still securitizing.  Again, definition of insanity (as I discussed in my last post).

The upcoming workshop dates … February 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd.  Times are Eastern (9 am – 1 pm).  For more details, see the Clouded Titles website.

 

 

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GUTTING THE UNDERBELLY OF THE BEAST – PART 3

(OP-ED, first posted: September 1, 2018) —

The writer of this post is a paralegal and consultant to attorneys on matters involving chain of title, foreclosures and document manufacturing.  The opinions expressed herein are that of the writer’s only and do not constitute legal or financial advice.  The author apologizes in advance for the graphic depiction of anything necessary (in the extreme) to shock your conscience into understanding that this is not recommended for you to try on your own. 

At some point in the equation, you are going to have to put your trust in someone that has (at least) studied “the system of things” and understands (basically) where it leads and how to approach it.

AGAIN … DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!  YOU’VE BEEN WARNED!  I am sharing talking points about a system here, not a boilerplate method where you get to exact revenge.  The following could be your end result if you attempt to do this yourself:

I just recently received a copy of the autopsy of Martin Wirth, a Park County, Colorado resident that was shot to death during an eviction process by the Sheriff’s Department. Another Sheriff’s deputy was shot to death, but after what I read in the autopsy findings, I find it hard to believe that Wirth had anything to do with the deputy’s death. After Waco and Tillman, we know that friendly fire deaths are indeed probable and cannot be ruled out.  In fact, the coroner’s findings were (from the Summary):

The autopsy reveals eleven entrance gunshot wounds involving the full spectrum of the back with a predominance of the mid-back. The autopsy further reveals five exit wounds involving the lower right neck and the mid and upper chest. A sixth exit wound is located in the upper abdomen, in the midline. At the autopsy, three bullets were retrieved outside the body. One bullet is found in the clothing related to the chest; a second bullet is found under the head while removing the clothing; a third bullet is retrieved from the body bag. Two large caliber bullets are recovered from the right and left anterior chest wall. One large caliber bullet remains deeply embedded in the left pelvis. The extensive internal injuries in this case associated with six anterior exit wounds preclude a precise definition of wound tracts.

For those of you who need an explanation, “anterior exit wounds” are sustained as the result of being shot in the back while running away from the gunfire!  How is one able to kill a Sheriff’s deputy while under siege, running out the back door of his home?  We have not heard the whole story. Was there a cover-up?  The news media reported that Wirth shot the deputies as they entered his residence.  They returned fire.  “Wirth died at the scene.”  (media reports)  What scene?  The autopsy said Wirth was found outside of his home on the ground.  How did he get outside (where the coroner’s report said his body was found) if he “died inside” upon return fire of the deputies?  There are a lot of unexplained scenarios here, ones the media can’t hold a candle to.

Based on what history has taught us, Wirth ended up being demonized in the media, just like Randy Weaver and David Koresh.  And let’s not forget Nevada notary Tracy N. Lawrence, who suddenly died of a 3-drug cocktail overdose on the day of her sentencing for one count of notary fraud (she offered to testify against two title officers of LSI Title Agency, Inc.).  Her death was ruled a suicide; however, I know dozens of Texas county clerks that would disagree with that finding because they were presented with those facts at the lecture series I presented to them in 2012. You could see their jaws drop. They were all shaking their head “no”.

You’re probably asking yourself why I intended to post this information.  I bring this up now because of the serious nature of attacking (on your own, because you think you can do better than someone with legal skill, knowledge and a law license) entities outside the scope of your foreclosure case.  I can think of a half dozen people that will ignore my warning here and risk ending up dead or in jail because they won’t listen to reason.  Sometimes I wonder why I even share stuff like this because it’s like giving a baby a stick of dynamite with a short fuse.  What you don’t know could kill you!  Did I scare the shit out of you yet?  You need to understand how serious this stuff is! I don’t know of any other way to emphasize what can happen to you if you self-implement, unless you’d care to Google David Koresh’s autopsy photos to see what an “end result” looks like!

Lest we forget, authorities came in and bulldozed over the “crime scene” at the Mount Carmel “compound”, obliterating any evidence.  A “compound” is defined as a 10′ x 10′ plywood shack (re: Weaver) or the average foreclosure victim’s home (re: Wirth) or the openly multiple-building, communal-style home (re: Branch Davidians).  Take your pick.  What’s behind Door #3?   None of them had fences and razor wire around them, so I have a hard time believing these fit the definition of a “compound”.  Oops!! I forgot.  That’s the term the government uses when it wants to demonize you in the media, so it can get the support of decent, hard-working, taxpaying voters who will support everything they’ve done under suspicious circumstances.

Now let’s get to the sum and substance of “the system of things” …

BONDS AND BONDING

Bonds can come in the form of cash or surety.  I want you to focus on these two and stop thinking about how the counties monetize bail bonds or bonds on their subjects they have detained or arrested.  This has nothing to do with the subject matter, but rather has evolved from Patriot-style behaviors, which I abhor, as this will get you put in jail or worse.

County judges and notaries commissioned by the state (or commonwealth) generally have to have a bond.  Some states do not require a notary bond; thus, the state itself may be held responsible for removing that requirement because a nexus was created when the Secretary of State issued a notary commission to the individual committing the crime (notarizing documents that contain false and misrepresentative information).  If the state doesn’t require a bond, then the notary is acting under the authority of the Secretary of State issuing the commission and thus, we would look to the state to cough up damage money as the result of felony behavior before the court.  What I’m talking about (in brief) here is the idea that bonds can be attacked; however, THIS TOO has to be done properly.  Every “punch line” HAS TO HAVE A “set-up”!

When a cop shoots somebody, what happens?  The cop is generally put on administrative leave while an investigation takes place.  Then a decision is made as to liability (whether the cop should be charged with murder or whether the shooting was justifiable).

What happens when a judge is required to have a bond and tolerates felony behavior in his court?   If someone challenges his bond, he may be placed on administrative leave while an investigation takes place and liability is determined.  There is a right way and a wrong way to even get close to challenging a judge’s bond.  Don’t think that attacking a judge’s bond won’t create statewide attention BECAUSE IT WILL!  Within 24 hours, every court official in the state will know it happened.

PATRIOT-STYLE CRAP

Some people think that filing liens against a judge is cute and that the judge will get his comeuppance.  THIS will get you a jail term, or worse.  I had a COTA workshop attendee do a year and a day for filing a lien against a state judge.  So if you like prison, try doing stupid shit like this!  All filing the lien does is screws up the judge’s credit until necessary measures (which involve spending money) are implemented to delete the lien from the public record.  Filing false liens is a felony in most states.  Please do not call me collect from your jail cell if you act the fool and file one of these liens against a judge because I will not bail you out!  You would be surprised how folks you know well distance themselves from you once you’ve been arrested and jailed!  Let me jog your memory because the State of Missouri just passed a new law (worth the read):

Missouri-2018-HB1769-Enrolled

I don’t know if you picked up on this or not, but Paragraphs 8 & 9 of this new bill appear to provide the framework in Missouri to do a C&E (I have taught this method in previous foreclosure defense workshops).    We do not file any type of liens as part of the process I am talking about here.  We do file a lis pendens.  The suit involves real property.  We have a methodology that requires precision in the creation of a paper trail.  THIS is what gets judges removed from the bench, not your pro se filing of judicial misconduct complaints.  Filing these is also a mistake, because most pro se litigants file them because they didn’t like the judge’s ruling.  Sorry, but that is what the appellate process is for.  I have heard that Patriot-type radio talk show hosts advocate doing this repeatedly to upset the system of things.  Taking that advice will lead you to a 6 x 8 cell with three hots and a cot.  The nature of judicial misconduct is reporting egregious behavior, like condoning felony perjury on behalf of the bank’s counsel.  THAT is what you file judicial misconduct complaints for.  This is why counties, most of whom are self-insured, get nervous when their Risk Managers are approached about this type of subject matter.  DO NOT CONTACT THEM YOURSELF!  We have a method for “getting their attention”!

THE BIGGEST, BADDEST PAPER TRAIL YOU CAN IMAGINE

I cannot stress to you enough that discovery and obtaining documented evidence and employing expert witness affidavits and testimony in the creation of a well-documented paper trail is ESSENTIAL to any success using this plan; otherwise, what do you have worth investigating.  I’ve yet to see a pro se litigant conduct proper discovery, let alone understand rules of civil procedure and rules of evidence to finality in their favor.  A majority of those reading this article won’t even know (if asked outright) what a declaratory judgment action is, let alone a state tort claims action.  The system of things may be overwhelming to many of you, but according to attorneys I’ve spoken with, it’s an eventual Achille’s heel in the system.  One attorney stated, “It’s a game changer!”  When counties don’t have money, they can’t function properly.   Government officials have to answer to voters and the media about the problem created by you, which is why they’ll try to settle before it becomes a 3-ring media circus.

As one attorney put it … you can change things with your vote … or you can change things employing specific tactics against “the system of things”.   I discuss this for educational purposes, because I get so many calls from frustrated foreclosure victims, who don’t know where to turn.  The problem is, the homeowners don’t know how to create the right paper trail.  Hell, I know attorneys that have stopped short of doing the right thing.  Malpractice is also a concern and with the tactics inside “the system of things”, these foreclosure defense attorneys should be worried as well, because “what applies to the goose can be applied to the gander”!

Without “the system of things” in place, we would succumb to financial ruin as a body politic and that could lead to the Civil War that the Rasmussen poll recently talked about.  I am not advocating the use of violence here, just common sense.

More to come about “the system of things” … so you can understand its layout and consequences!

 

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