Tag Archives: Cancellation & Expungement action

GUTTING THE UNDERBELLY OF THE BEAST – PART 8

(OP-ED, first posted: September 22, 2018) — 

The writer of this post is a paralegal and consultant to attorneys on matters involving chain of title, foreclosures and document manufacturing.  The opinions expressed herein are that of the writer’s only and do not constitute legal or financial advice.  Any use of the theories or ideas suggested in this post is entirely at your discretion and will probably result in disaster without the proper legal help.

In the segment numbered “Part 7” of these successive posts, there was a boatload of case law wherein judges did the right thing.  As you probably noticed from reading In re Wilson, it involved improper reporting of the posting of payments (all while the foreclosure was still being commenced).  Another case (M & T Bank v. Smith) involved multiple manufactured promissory notes (after the fact) that could have not possibly happened the way the bank’s attorneys said they did. To that end, the judge did the right thing, by: (1) holding an evidentiary hearing; and (2) sanctioning the Marshall C. Watson Law Firm, noting that the Marshall C. Watson Law Firm has gained notoriety for filing false assignments in the land records!  This is EXACTLY what I intimated was STILL GOING ON in the real property records, included in the OSCEOLA COUNTY FORENSIC EXAMINATION.

And sadly, these same attorneys that are representing the banks’ servicers went to the same law schools as the foreclosure defense attorneys seated at the opposing table.  The “good ‘ol boy network” reaches up into the judiciary, because judges were attorneys at one point.  Everybody who’s anybody knows somebody in the profession.  Their relationships are more than cordial.  Many of them run so deep that some foreclosure defense attorneys have tempered their aggressive behaviors, despite the fact they want to do the first thing by their clients (whether their clients know it or not).  The bigger part of the problem is the one thing that all attorneys learn in law school: find some way to settle.  When someone’s home is at stake, settling for less than a completely positive outcome shouldn’t even be on the table.  In fact, it’s an insult to the homeowner’s intelligence (what was the lawyer thinking?).  This is not to say that someone cannot rise up and call this chicanery for what it is: fraud on the court, compounded by felony components and ethical violations worthy of disbarment.  This is what should have happened in every case posted in Part 7!

Aside from all of the arguments over the various issues you hear in the courtroom, the judges keep tabs on everything that’s said and they watch the clock fastidiously. You only get so much time, which is why getting all of your discovery done ahead of time is important, along with the intended depositions.  This is all part of building that big, bad ass paper trail I talked about on earlier posts. The bigger the paper trail, the more evidence you have to help the affected insurance company either deny a claim or pay out on a claim!

Now we’re going to get even more serious …

The Oregon State Bar was sued by two of its member attorneys in U.S. District Court under 42 U.S.C. §§ 1983 and 1988.   Read the 7-page Complaint here:

Gruber, Runnels v Oregon State Bar, US D. Ore No 3-18-cv-1591 (Aug 29, 2018)

CASE IN POINT: THE DETAILS

Notice here that the Defendant is referred to as “a public corporation” established pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes § 9.010 (imagine the liability there)?

Also notice that on the last page, the Oregon State Bar put out a press release that smacks of political overtones.  Is this organization a State Bar or a political action committee?

And this is just the tip of the iceberg.  By publishing that single-page ideologue, the State Bar hierarchy has just “positioned its own agenda”.  And you wonder where judges get their agendas?  Who put this “free house” crap in their heads in the first place?  This is only part of the bullshit that has most Americans distrusting their judicial system.  That is not a good thing under “the system of things”.  Stuff like that leads to civil unrest (or hasn’t Congress noticed?) or civil disobedience.  Hey wait!  We’re already seeing that in America … just read the State Bar’s ideologue!

The State Bar Associations have errors and omissions insurance that can be challenged if they fail (as a public corporation) to do the right thing by the people and instead, push their own agendas on the body politic.  I’m talking foreclosed homes by attorneys who lied in court and used phony assignments to bolster their claims of standing, created by servicers and their employees to steal private property because they didn’t do the paperwork properly when the loan was first executed (and potentially securitized).  This makes the entire process liable (if not in the least, suspect), especially when the state bar (in this case, Oregon) sets a bad example by putting out political statements instead of remaining neutral and unbiased.  Why not say something like most judges do in foreclosure courts (and I’m being really sarcastic here):

“When’s the last time you made a mortgage payment?”

At that point, it doesn’t matter what you say, the judge already has his mind made up, despite whether the banks’ attorneys are all accessories to felony conspiracy and fraud, along with a multitude of ethical violations that could get them disbarred (and potentially imprisoned)  I am waiting for the day (and I think I’ll see it in my lifetime) when a judge gets his bond revoked and gets removed from the bench because he (or she) was warned of the felony components of the attorney’s behavior (for the bank) and ignored it … and didn’t do the right thing.  The damage is suffered when the judge issues the final judgment of foreclosure.  At that point, a sale date is set and all is lost unless somebody recants or the judge changes his mind.

And it’s all based on the phony assignments.  Shouldn’t someone be held liable?  I’m not talking about a corporate fine here either.  I’m talking about prison time for the perpetrators of the documents! 

MOTIONS TO VACATE

Lest the judge not have fair warning and be allowed to change his (or her) mind, based on newly-proffered evidence, the bank’s attorneys may end up losing more than their case.  In fact, because of felony behavior, or any collusion with felony behavior (i.e., Oh, sorry I robbed that bank … I was only the getaway driver; here’s the money back) … fraud can pierce not only corporate veils, but all operating agreements sanctioned by the state to where the individual managing attorneys and partners are all personally liable to the homeowner.  If it’s a major law firm, they’ll probably try to avoid filing an insurance claim, because the felony behavior would “come out in the wash” and the firm would never get insurance coverage again and would have to either self-insure or dissolve. And that, my friends, is how we take down a law firm … because they’re going to want to settle … but if there’s a class action of over 1,000 homeowners … who is going to cough up all that money to pay those 1,000 claims under statute?  Someone is not only going “broke”, but the State Bar had better make sure they don’t commit felonies again (through disbarment).  Now they get to figure out, with a felony involving moral turpitude, good luck getting a job at Wal-Mart.  How would they pay off those $250,000+ in student loans?  Boo-hoo!  (sobbing)  … NOT!

So the Motion to Vacate serves as a tool to make the court aware of the illicit behavior … and why.  If the court ignores it, the judge and the county he acts in become participants in the fraud and felony behavior.  This is when things get dicey.  The “system of things” is going to try to draw a “fine line” as to whether the behavior was unintentional or malicious.  This is why we need court transcripts!  If the judge makes an “agenda statement” (i.e., “No one gets a free house!”; “When’s the last time you made a mortgage payment?”; or “You’ve lived in that house for free long enough!”).  This type of speech not only promotes a specific “agenda”, it could lead to more sinister issues. AND …

No one to this point has thought to inform the county’s risk manager with the proper ammunition.  Every pro se litigant that has tried going through the risk manager has failed miserably because they do NOT know HOW to properly “connect” with the person responsible for “damage control”.

SOVEREIGN IMMUNITY

All judges in every state enjoy this privilege.  Unfortunately, many of them let it go to their heads.

States also enjoy this privilege.  Isn’t that amazing how they get to legislate themselves this privilege?

Judges get to “play God for 5 minutes” in foreclosure court, not realizing the scenario may present itself to mandates that require them to “do the right thing”.  Because they have “agendas” (“NO ONE GETS A FREE HOUSE!”), they are more quick to “step into the pile of shit” that is about to be created for them.  They have to answer to a judicial review board.  If it can be shown that a felony was committed, on top of multiple ethical violations … and the judge did nothing about it after being called out on those violations … their sovereign immunity is in jeopardy.  Any judge reading this article should take to heart what I’m saying, because the counties are self-insured and most of its officials have to answer to voters.  What if that class action also includes the judge (or judges) involved in the multiple felonies committed in hundreds of cases still applicable in their county?  What if the statutes of limitation are tolled because of the ongoing behavior?  Sure, it’s going to be a sticking point, but, the fact is, no insurance company or bonding company is going to shell out any legal fees to pay for the accessory criminal behavior of an attorney or judge in representing them (paying their attorney’s fees).  The judge will not be able to get another bond, ever, because his or her bond would have been revoked.  That “bond” is an insurance policy designed by “the system of things” to compensate the injured for their losses.   The “senior judges” that were brought out of retirement to preside over foreclosure courts could find themselves and their estate liable as well.  In most states, personal injury judgments are NOT dischargeable in bankruptcy … especially when the parties were warned of potential felony issues and ignored them! 

If the entire Supreme Court of the State of West Virginia can be impeached for felony misbehavior (embezzlement, unjust enrichment and misappropriation of state property), then what makes the judges in the foreclosure courts think they can get away with imposing their political agendas on homeowners when the banks and their servicers are feloniously culpable for fraudulent document manufacturing (or in the least, being co-conspirators to that effect)?

And no, this is NOT going to collapse the entire system of things.  This “too big to fail” bullshit is nothing more than fear mongering.  The “system of things” was created “By the People, For the People”.

Thus, if a class action lawsuit of affected homeowners went after just ONE LAW FIRM and its supervising attorney and its managing partners and took a judge along for the ride as well, especially if the judge had anything to do with the properties he issued orders of final judgments against, now THAT would be something!  That would send a clear message that the “safeguards” that are in place in “the system of things” actually work!

C & E’s JUST BECAME MORE EFFECTIVE! 

These same principles work outside of the realm of the foreclosure proceeding, especially when challenging phony documents or statements made in the pleadings of foreclosure mill attorneys that are false and misrepresentative.  It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that an Affidavit from an Expert Witness Attorney who identifies the false and misrepresentative information, along with the ethical violations, will strike discord in the heart of the lawyer(s) bringing the foreclosure action.  And you wonder why there are substitutions of counsel when things get dicey in a foreclosure case.  Again, it has everything to do with something illegal happening behind the scenes that the foreclosure mills want to avoid exposure on.  That makes the C & E (Cancellation & Expungement) action even more important!

C & E actions are declaratory in nature.  They open up discovery like a Pandora’s Box.  Once the court is notified of the statutory and ethical violations, it must do the right thing and hold a hearing to preserve the sanctity of the justice system.  If ignored, the judge hearing the case deserves what’s coming because the entire “system” that’s supposed to be in place (in his Court) just went to shit!  Then it’s no holds barred.  His county is self-insured and would rather put him on administrative leave and attempt a crack at “damage control” and quietly settling out of court.  Of course, this is why attorneys are taught to settle FIRST in law school.  That way, they don’t have to air dirty laundry in front of the judge.  Again, and I reiterate this with utmost sincerity, most Americans don’t trust the justice system as it is, which is why “the system of things” is in existence … it all involves insurance and who pays for the damage claims, if in fact they pay out anything (this work to the opposing party’s detriment, or it could work to your benefit … you don’t get both most of the time).

THE CONSPIRACY AND THE UNDERLYING TORT

Fraud is a tort.  The elements of fraud are also expensive to prove.  The elements of negligence however are not.  KNEW OR SHOULD HAVE KNOWN … BUT FAILED TO ACT would seem to apply here.  This is much easier to prove, especially if it was willful.  Imagine getting discovery from one of the robosigners or the notary involved in the document creation, all singing like canaries to avoid felony perjury prosecution.   What are the banks and their servicers (and title companies) going to do?  Kill all the notaries so they can’t testify against them.  Three words here: Remember Tracy Lawrence?

Misrepresentation is also a tort.   Couple that with negligence and you have negligent misrepresentation.   Go to your jury instructions to find out WHAT you have to prove to win your case … see here, see here (courtesy of the State of Tennessee, where MERS ain’t shit!):

Jury_Instructions_-_Misrepresentation

Jury_Instructions_-_Negligence

Remember (from previous posts) that conspiracy is only actionable as a tort in certain states (by statute).  In a majority of states, conspiracy, while not actionable, can be used to prove an underlying tort, through discovery, while exposing all of the parties involved, especially if a law firm is involved in creating the phony assignment being used to prove standing to foreclose on you!   Yes, it costs money dammit!  You want justice?

 

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GUTTING THE UNDERBELLY OF THE BEAST – PART 5

(OP-ED, first posted: September 7, 2018) —

The writer of this post is a paralegal and consultant to attorneys on matters involving chain of title, foreclosures and document manufacturing.  The opinions expressed herein are that of the writer’s only and do not constitute legal or financial advice.  Any use of the theories or ideas suggested in this post is entirely at your discretion and will probably result in disaster without the proper legal help.

Now comes the fun part!

It’s not the punch line … it’s the back end of the set-up!

This is where risk aversion and the filing of claims are twained!

JURISDICTION

When a real estate brokerage, title company, document mill or law firm is created, incorporated or organized by statute (an LLC, an LP, an LLP, a PA, a PC, etc.), these are statutory creatures of the state they are formed, organized or incorporated in.  This means the state has jurisdiction over the  “misbehaviors” of these entities and the agents-representatives-employees who represent them.  Someone has to answer to somebody for something!

In a law firm, there are named partners, of which one of them is a managing partner or supervising attorney.  That person generally is the contact person for not only service of process (can act as the Registered Agent or is in contact with the Registered Agent) but is also the individual that is named as the contact person for the firm’s errors and omissions (“E & O”) insurance.  Law firm E & O insurance costs are hefty, depending on the number of attorneys, partners, etc. to be insured.  It is implied here that each participating attorney has: (1) an education in law; (2) has passed the state bar exam; and (3) has applied for and received a license to practice law in that state for which he or she sat for the state bar in.  Whether the attorney is a novice or a seasoned veteran, each attorney has to pass muster for moral turpitude and character before getting licensed.  The state bars are generally the policing agency responsible for disciplining attorneys when they do something egregious or violate any of the Rules of Professional Conduct.  In short, everyone in the law firm, including the partners and the supervisory attorneys are liable and held responsible by the disciplinary agency that governs their behaviors, namely, the state bar’s disciplinary committee.  These committees are generally off-shoots of the judicial system of things in each state.   The behaviors of lawyers are regulated by the states they practice in, so each state’s Supreme Court decides whether they practice law in their respective states or not.  The supervising attorney is also responsible for the behaviors of all of the “non-lawyers” working in the firm.  The foregoing is a restatement for insurance purposes … we’ll get to that in a moment.

UPL: THE UNAUTHORIZED PRACTICE OF LAW

Each state bar also has an Unauthorized Practice of Law Committee, which generally is an organized group of “henchmen” that investigate matters of relevance when non-lawyers either: (a.) attempt to represent paying clients as attorneys or advocates; and (b.) practice law, which is a statutorily-prescribed and heavily-regulated profession.  Part of the problem with today’s society is that even though attorneys have to go through a lot of schooling and testing and licensing, a lot of the body politic doesn’t trust them.  There have been numerous instances where malpractice has been committed and thus, a lot of attorneys have made a bad name for the profession.  People don’t even trust the profession as a whole, because many state bar associations don’t discipline their misbehaving lawyers enough or to the degree that it satisfies the desires of the body politic.  This is why non-lawyers have jumped into the legal fray.  In real property law, lawyers are tasked with document review to make sure that everything contained within a document is legally sound.  Because of the unveiling of illegitimate processes conducted by servicers and their lackeys in creating phony documents, everyone thinks they know how to read, analyze, interpret and determine various causes of action that will fall right in line with getting a paycheck equal to or better than a practicing lawyer. Promoting oneself as having the ability to review documents and give opinions about what’s in them had better have been followed with “J.D.” and “Esq.” (yes, I know, it’s a title of nobility … let’s not go there!); otherwise, the UPL Committee steps in when they become aware of the practice.  You see, in the legal system, the UPL Committees were set up to protect the paychecks of attorneys and not the paychecks of non-lawyers!  Most non-lawyer violators (for UPL) get ONE warning.  If they keep doing what they were warned ONCE NOT TO DO, then felony charges are filed against them and they are prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.  The foregoing is a restatement for insurance purposes … we’ll get to that in a moment.

FORECLOSURE COURT JUDGES

This body of “lawyers” have either been elected or appointed to serve on the bench because they have demonstrated the capacity in the understanding of the rules of civil procedure, the rules of criminal procedure, the rules of evidence and generally, the body of law that accompanies the field they serve as judges in.  For the purposes of this article, I focus on the state judges and NOT federal (as they are appointed for life) because state judges are generally elected and thus responsible to voters and constituents alike.  They are also responsible to the county they serve in while on the bench and hold themselves out as “employees” of the county, with the privilege of sovereign immunity from the decisions they make.  These judges also have a Code of Conduct (or Judicial Canons) which they must abide by.  In Florida, for example, when a judge is suspected of committing an infraction that harms the public or specific persons within the cases he or she rules upon in the process of presiding over a case, that judge can be brought up on disciplinary charges before the Judicial Qualifications Commission (the “JQC”).  Every state has some sort of judicial disciplinary committee, even though they may have different names.  The Supreme Courts of each state can also determine whether a judge remains on the bench, based on their behaviors or the lack thereof, albeit in their consideration of the recommendations of the judicial disciplinary committee.

EXPOSURE AND RISK

We now come to the part about how “state statutes” play into the mix.  Virtually every state has “fraudulent document statutes”.  Some have less severe penalties than others. I put them all into The Quiet Title War Manual under “state-specific resources”, which took up half the book, explaining in three paragraphs on actionable offenses in each state regarding the recording of false documents.

In Florida, for example, the state legislature enacted the Florida Criminal Code § 817.535, which makes it a third-degree felony to record a document known to contain false and misrepresentative statements for the purposes (intent) to steal the property (by and through the foreclosure process) … PLUS … a fine equal to the market value of the home!  Missouri just recently passed a similar statute, which also allows for doing a Cancellation & Expungement action to clear title of bogus assignments and other related documents.

Interestingly enough, the foregoing Florida statute also has a “civil component”.  This is equally important to understand, as the statute is interchangeable in concept, yet its meaning is clear … you record a phony document in order to create standing and further rely on it in court, you’re in trouble!  This puts everyone whose name appears in the recorded assignment at risk. The subsequent filing of foreclosure complaint pleadings, which rely on false and misrepresentative statements in order to claim the right to foreclose, put the actors within the document at legal risk.  Once the “assignment” itself (containing the false and misrepresentative information) is recorded, other documents can then be challenged based on the falsity of the information contained in the assignments, such as: (a.) Appointments of Substitute Trustee; (b.) Affidavits of Lost Note; and (c.) Notice of Default and Sale.  Post-foreclosure, any transfer in title through Trustee’s Deeds or Clerk’s Deeds can also be challenged, predicated on the falsity of the statements contained within the assignment that was manufactured in order to create standing.

The county clerks are immune from suits in the removal of phony documents, as they are generally mandated by statute to record what is given to them, as long as it contains all of the elements of a proper recording (according to statute).  Still, John O’Brien, the Register of Deeds from Southern Essex District in Massachusetts, will not record documents that contain the name of known robosigners.  Some states’ clerks will turn over suspicious documents to their local DA’s for review before recording.  This still does not absolve the wrongdoing if the documents contain false and misrepresentative information.

This is not the part where you read the foregoing and get mad.  This is the part where you get “clarity”.  It’s all about the assignments!   It’s always been about the assignments!  Any attorney, trustee, auctioneer or any law firm or title company attempting to transfer title as the result of either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure has EXPOSURE and thus, inherent RISK of being attacked (“called on the carpet”) and held liable! These types of behaviors are what insurance companies are trying to avoid!

To finalize this section of my work, let’s posit for a moment that the attorney brought this assignment up in court (or attached it to his pleadings as an Exhibit) and got the court to rely on it’s validity, even though the other side brought in an expert witness attorney who testified as to the falsity of the document’s contents and the judge ignored the expert attorney’s testimony and awarded the property to the bank anyway.  Let’s also include that fact that most of the time, it’s the mortgage loan servicer that is claiming to have authority to foreclose on behalf of the lender, with no Limited Power of Attorney (“LPOA”) to show for it.  This document can also be challenged, because these documents are restrictive in nature and many times, there’s noting in the LPOA that allows the servicer to foreclose (but do everything else, which increases its exposure as well).

Everyone in the foregoing scenario has to answer to a higher authority   There are title companies out there who help the banks foreclose on real property and they get to answer to the State Department of Insurance.  Mortgage loan servicers have to be licensed and bonded and have to answer to the Department of Banking and Finance.  If this wasn’t so, Fidelity National Financial wouldn’t have been so quick to “spin off” Lender Processing Services when the SHTF post-financial collapse of 2008 and DOCX became a 3-ring media circus, resulting in the prosecution and imprisonment of Lorraine M. Brown, it’s principal.

It is at this point that we start to create the biggest, baddest paper trail imaginable … and I will explain that paper trail in my next segment … stay tuned!!

 

 

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