Category Archives: Financial Education

Coming Soon to the Clouded Titles Website …

BREAKING NEWS — 

In keeping with the tradition of educational information, the Clouded Titles website will soon feature a monthly newsletter called, “THE RICH REPORT”, a monthly in-depth analysis designed and delivered by retired attorney Richard L. DiMaggio, J.D., who will cover pertinent, on-going cases involving FDCPA, debt collection issues, FCRA, credit report issues, TILA, RESPA, identity theft, mortgage fraud and other important financial news affecting homeowners, borrowers and debtors alike.

The monthly service will be subscription-based and will bring you the hottest news, information and legal analysis of consumer-oriented issues by one of the top FDCPA attorneys in the country.  Richard L. DiMaggio, J.D. wrote the book, “Collection Agency Harassment: What the Debt Collector Doesn’t Want You to Know”.  THE RICH REPORT will be delivered right to your email inbox every month in pdf format for easy reading.  THE RICH REPORT is a great supplement for anyone reading FORECLOSURE, DEBT COLLECTION AND FORECLOSURES, by Dave Krieger, available on the Clouded Titles Website NOW (and also through The Power Mall on The Power Hour!)

Mr. DiMaggio will be joining me on The Power Hour, with Joyce Riley, at 9:00 a.m. Central Standard Time on Monday, February 27, 2017 to discuss FDCPA and debt collection issues.  Needless to say, this will be a powerful broadcast!  Put it on your calendar and plan on tuning in live.  Joyce Riley will also be taking telephone calls related to the subject matter, so if you’ve got anything to add, please feel free to chime in.  She’ll give the number out on the show!

 

 

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Filed under Breaking News, Debt Collection and Foreclosures, FCRA Education, FDCPA, FDCPA Education, Financial Education

FLORIDA HOMEOWNERS SHOULD STAY OUT OF BK 7 COURTS IF THEY WANT TO FIGHT FORECLOSURES!

The author of this post is not giving legal advice, just reporting what’s out there.  You should consult a competent foreclosure defense attorney regarding such matters, as the contents in this post appear to reflect the court’s intolerance for homeowners who file bankruptcy to stop a foreclosure. 

OP-ED — 

Folks who are in trouble with their mortgages in Florida really need to strategize before taking the plunge into the abyss known as the Florida legal system, where state judges clearly have “agendas”, the Florida Legislature has “agendas” and the federal courts have “agendas” … all aimed at taking of property when you can’t make the payments on it.  It’s not often that the author of this post steers away from chain of title issues, but there appears to be widespread ignorance (or in the alternative, intolerance) on the part of the Sunshine State’s legal system, which makes things “not so shiny” anymore, given the recent spate of legislation and court actions.

STATE JUDGES

All one needs to do is examine court dockets to see how fast, over time, that Florida circuit judges have blindly assumed that the financial institutions coming before them actually own the promissory note they’re trying to enforce.  It would seem that judges simply rely on the blatant attack on the property owner as just because otherwise, why would this particular bank show up in court?   Because they can!  And they do!  And judges give them so much leeway that Florida homeowners are stymied for options.  This is why the State of Florida has so many zombie homes (despite what the politicians, economists and the media would have you believe) and shadow inventory that sits empty because of title issues.  In very few cases I’ve examined have I seen evidence within a transcript that allowed for a forensic examination of the note, to make sure it’s “original”, like the bank’s attorney says it is.  To show you that the inequity between state court systems is similar in nature, I’m consulting a case in New Jersey where the bank’s law firm sent a “cover lawyer” into court with what appeared to be a “faxed copy” of the note, claiming it to be the “original”.  I think most judges, even in light of the foreclosure defense attorney’s objections, could tell the difference, but nope … this judge said that the word of the law firm and the faxed copy of what it self-authenticated is good enough!  Can you believe that shit?

Another part of the equation is the existence of foreclosure defense lawyers who have seen fit to turn the foreclosure debacle into a cash cow by using delay tactics to keep property owners in their homes, despite the probable outcome that only about 1 in 25 cases brought into court makes it past the 810-day mark in a Florida foreclosure cycle.  Knowing that the odds are never “in their favor” (attributing the quotation to The Hunger Games), frustrated mortgagors then contemplate using bankruptcy court to dodge the “sale bullet”. However, things in Florida are about to change.

THE FLORIDA LEGISLATURE

Effective July 1, 2017, Florida homeowners who run to the bankruptcy court and get their promissory note discharged are going to find themselves without other options to fight the foreclosure.  See House Bill 471 here if you don’t believe me: fl-hb-471  It’s only two pages long and I’m sure you can read (if you’re reading this)!

Simply put, any documentation that is filed in Bankruptcy Court which would indicate surrender of the property (commonly seen in Chapter 7 cases) makes it legally okay for the bank’s attorney to submit that document that was filed in the Bankruptcy Court under penalty of perjury to a Florida circuit judge to get a Final Judgment of Foreclosure.  I see this as a definite negative if you’re trying to fight a foreclosure.  But then again, most homeowners are like electricity.  They want to take the path of least resistance; and declaring bankruptcy is certainly a hell of a lot cheaper than fighting a foreclosure through Florida’s appellate system.

It appears that folks don’t understand the difference between an in rem and an in personam action.  Enforcement of a security instrument, which in Florida’s case is a mortgage, can only happen when the party claiming to have an interest in the property can prove ownership.  An attack on the property through the recorded security instrument is an in rem action (like quiet title actions).  This is why I wrote the book The Quiet Title War Manual (with the professional help of California attorney Al West).  The book explains the difference between the note and the mortgage.  Folks who don’t get it should get this book and read it, because when Al West and I taught quiet title workshops, we hammered these basic principles into the heads of the attendees.  In personam actions are actions involving debt, which in this case is the promissory note, NOT the mortgage!   How convenient it is that the Florida legislature has come up with this House Bill in the wake of the recent court conflicts within the federal system!

THE FLORIDA FEDERAL COURTS

Let’s look at the case of In re Hookerin-re-hooker   Once you get past the first three paragraphs, you’ll understand why the Florida legislature did what it did to help the banks fight continuous counterattacks in state court.  Again, how convenient, to avoid further confusion in the courts.  Let’s just legislate this away, shall we?

Now we come to the slam dunk that affects the way the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals (which covers Florida), has ruled that Chapter 7 debtors who file a bankruptcy action and put forth a statement of intention to surrender the real property cannot later contest a foreclosure in the state court. in-re-failla   If you read the first paragraph of this PUBLISHED OPINION, and then read the background on the case, it appears that the homeowners wanted to “have their cake and eat it too”.  The Failla case simply states: “Debtors who surrender property must get out of the creditor’s way.”   The Florida Legislature (I believe) made sure that a bill was passed that shut off the trough at the source of the feed (so to speak).

No more hogs at the trough.  There have been so many different points of view, it’s understandable that the Florida legislature would pass a bill that state courts could point a finger at and say, “SEE?”   So for those of you thinking that running into bankruptcy court (in any state for that matter) and declaring your intent to surrender the property (God forbid, why would you do that?) under penalty of perjury is so confusing to some when their state court cases get shut down.

ANOTHER WHAMMY! 

It has also become relatively apparent that any homeowner that has placed themselves in the foregoing position and continue to litigate their foreclosure in the state courts of Florida are likely to get sanctioned!   Vexatious litigants are likely to wind up in jail on contempt charges!  I say this because of what happened to foreclosure defense attorney Stuart Golant, 70,  in the Palm Beach County courtroom of Senior Judge Howard Harrison for simply making a motion!

Florida homeowners have had the deck stacked against them by the courts and the legislature in favor of the banks when it comes to promissory note enforcement.  Once a mortgage has been recorded in the land records where the subject property is situated, all it takes is a missed payment and the door to “foreclosure hell” opens to swallow the homeowners whole.   I can’t help but wonder what kind of counseling homeowners have received, given the phone calls and emails I get regarding strategizing an in personam case against them.

ONE MORE TIME …

In a judicial foreclosure state like Florida, a lender comes to court and waves the promissory note around and claims it has the right to enforce the terms of the note!  It should be required to prove that the note is genuine, forensically.  Have the actual paper tested.  Have the ink tested.  Check for pixelation by blowing the note up on a computer screen to examine evidence the note was photoshopped.  Object to the note being entered as the original.  I believe a majority of securitized notes are copies of what was downloaded into the MERS® System and later shredded, as I’ve covered in previous posts.

Once the lender gets the note in front of the court and gets it admitted into evidence and gets the court to agree that U.C.C. Article 3 (Negotiable Instruments) exists and that the alleged lender has the right to enforce the note, THEN the Lender gets to enforce the Security Instrument, the in rem part of the equation.  The security instrument (Mortgage) is then “ripe for the picking”.  Believe it or not, most homeowners think that the lender is foreclosing on the mortgage.  That couldn’t be further from the truth!  The Lender is foreclosing on the Note.  Proving it has the right to enforce the Note means the Lender gets the right to enforce the Security Instrument, not until!

Bankruptcy Courts are designed to handle in personam scenarios.  In personam relates to debt.  Promissory notes are evidence of debt!   Recorded mortgages are evidence of security interests, not debt!   If you’re going to use the bankruptcy court to alleviate your personal obligation to the note, and liquidate it in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceeding, be prepared to move out of your home!

Thinking twice about running into Chapter 7 bankruptcy court to stop the sale?   The “system” is ready for you!   (Hint: This is why we have Chapters 11 and 13!)  No matter, if you live in any state where you think the “deck is stacked” against you, plan your “end game” BEFORE you go into default, not after!

And this is why I don’t talk about in personam issues much.  Homeowners really should get a financial education before they sit down at the closing table.

Tune into kdwradio.com every Friday night at 6:00 p.m. EST for my radio show, City Spotlight: Special Edition!   Order any of the author’s books by visiting Clouded Titles!

For those of you waiting for the new FDCPA book, it’s almost ready!   Pre-order your copy today!  (FDCPA actions are for dealing with debt collectors!)

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Filed under Financial Education, Op-Ed Piece

SURVIVING FORECLOSURE

Op-Ed … 

One of the greatest achievements in life is being able to own a home.  It’s an outward sign of wealth building.  It’s one of the biggest financial commitments that a person can make, not necessarily one they should make.

The banking industry in America continues to survive despite all of the scandal that continues to plague them.  Many folks survived the economic fiasco of 2008 because the entire economy was not affected.  When only a marginal number of homeowners are affected, seemingly, the rest of the country simply falls asleep, chalking up the massive foreclosure market as a “numbers game”.  Investors came out of the woodwork, thinking they were getting a great deal, when in fact, 99% of all of the foreclosure actions conducted in this country are illegal.

The reason these foreclosures are illegal can be summed up in one word: securitization.

Most people that signed on to mortgage loans between 2003 and 2008 had no idea that they were going to be victimized by an entity called Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. and its parent, now known as MERSCORP Holdings, Inc.  It has been communicated to me by numerous attorneys that the MERS® System was created specifically for the purposes of online digital transfers of promissory notes within the secondary mortgage market and that any claim by MERS that it has any part of “title” to your property is superfluous folly.  MERS and its parent have continuously fought that in courts across America.  It is impossible to see why a court system would give a for-profit private entity that is not in the business of lending money beneficial status.  Some states have figured that flaw out, too late to avoid creating conflicting case law.  If the states wanted to be smart about it, they would do what Oregon counties are doing, patterning their suits after Multnomah County’s case, which resulted in a $9-million settlement, something unheard of, unless you want to keep MERS and its hierarchy out of prison.  In my book, criminal RICO is afoot here and MERS has provided the platform for that to occur in the form of servicer fraud.  Servicer’s employees are allowed to robosign and backdate assignments, falsify authority and manufacture standing for lender’s who are not “the boss of the note” which is what, largely in part, makes these 99% of the foreclosures illegal.

On the backside of this equation, homeowners who are unwilling to challenge the beast are fleeing their homes in record numbers and the shadow inventory still continues to plague the real estate market.

But what of the homeowners?

As I have stated on this blog before (in previous posts), 75% of those being served with foreclosure notices vacate their properties within thirty (30) days of notice.  The other 20% of those vacate their homes after being made aware an issuance of a final judgment of foreclosure or notice of a sale date.  The 95% was ill prepared to retain counsel to even challenge their foreclosure and the greater majority never even showed up to court to contest their foreclosure (in mortgage states).  The banks know this.  It’s a numbers game.  The banks are at a financial advantage because they’ve made all their money off of interest earned (as do the servicers with all of their fees added into the mix) and the banks have a legal fund to fight with.  Bank of America is estimated to spend roughly $2-billion annually in legal fees, most of which goes to fighting homeowners just like you and I in court.  Whether or not Bank of America can actually prove it has standing to foreclose depends on how many assignments their servicing unit manufactures, because that’s exactly what they do when there’s a default (someone stops making their mortgage payments).

Of the 5% of the remaining homeowners, 3-4% of them duke it out in court.  The other 1-2% take “cash for keys” or negotiate a loan modification, albeit the party negotiating with them probably doesn’t have the right to enter into a loan modification agreement at all.  I would estimate that roughly less than 1/2-percent actually succeed in getting a loan mod at all.  Most of the major banks, who are monitoring and servicing their alleged secondary market REMICs, who have no skin in the game, would rather have your house than put up with giving you a loan mod.

Contrary to what the banks and the media would have you believe, only about 1% of the 95% of homeowners end up actually “homeless”.  Living in your vehicle also constitutes as being “homeless”, about as much as living in a tent city, illegally living in a storage unit or under a bridge or on a sidewalk.  These 1% are seen on street corners panhandling for money.  Surprisingly, there are also racketeers that panhandle to make their mortgage payments (or go party on their gains, which in my book is totally dishonest).  It’s hard to tell who’s who because they all dress the part and carry cardboard signs.

The other 94% are either living with family members or have become substandard renters while they attempt to regroup.  If bankruptcy was utilized to “buy time”, a negative credit score of about 450 points will tank the debtor’s ability to recover for at least 3 years.  My problem with helping out many of these homeowners in “short sale” position is that I am suspicious of the bank’s real interest in the property.  If I look in the county land records, what am I going to find?   No matter.   Short sales are preludes to foreclosures.   If I see a spate of short sales in any given market, foreclosures are about 90 days behind them.  Remember, the bank would rather have your house.  They have no skin in the game and the longer they stay “in the game”, the more potential there is to discover their misdeeds.  Their mission is to cash out and this is what has made them rich.

I have been getting numerous texts and emails from folks who have told me what they have done to survive a foreclosure.  Unlike me, who had a rental property I could move into when I did a strategic default on my primary residence in 2003 (and later sold it for a handsome profit, which turned into a scheme that made me mortgage free), most homeowners have no “end game”.   They made no plans. Most made no plans because they live from paycheck to paycheck.   I heard one investor say, “Working hard builds character.”  Well, that may be true but if there’s more month at the end of the money, character has no place in contingency planning.  People will do amazing things.

I beg to hear of your story on this post, as it will give inspiration to others who are faced with similar plights.  Please comment. 

I have also heard that people have utilized an outbuilding or barn, moved it onto a piece of vacant land (either one they owned or owner financed) and built a house out of it.  It’s primitive, but at least it’s a roof over your head.  So are mobile homes, if you can find them cheap enough.   I lived in one for 4 years and fixed it up so it didn’t even look like a mobile home inside.  I made a handsome profit selling it when I made my next move.  I am one of those that is not complacent.  No matter what happens, I am resolved and determined to bounce back.  I paid off the mobile home in one year and invested about $4500 fixing it up over time.  The owner of the land I bought was happy when I sold it because he got paid in full when he was facing a family medical crisis and needed the funds badly; so it was a “helping hand” to him.  At least I had clear title.

This is a problem for many homeowners because fighting a foreclosure means proving the title is jacked up.  This is no fun when you don’t know what you’re looking for.  This is why many homeowners don’t do what you’re doing and subscribe to this blog and do research into chain of title.  If everyone in America did the kind of research you and I do, we wouldn’t be in this mess in the first place.  This country’s economy would have bounced back on its own and we wouldn’t be depending on politicians to fix it for us.

We are in an upturn real estate market (in most of America) and this begs for opportunity.  I always like real estate investing because it means creating wealth through equity positioning.  If you are NOT in a position to give up, it would be better to rebound into another investment property as soon as possible, even if it’s owner financed.  This is why (in the book Clouded Titles) I talk about having garage sales and liquidating stuff on Craigslist and places like that, because “lightening the load” affords opportunity when downsizing.  This is part of the end game plan for most folks.  You may have some other ideas, which I welcome here, because I want to know what you did to survive a foreclosure.  So do my other readers.  Despite the setbacks you faced, try to have a happy holiday season.

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ANOTHER CLASSIC EXAMPLE OF WHY I BELIEVE YOUR PROMISSORY NOTE WAS SHREDDED …

OP-ED — The author of this post is a consultant to attorneys in quiet title actions and foreclosure defense matters involving chain of title. However, in this particular instance, I accidentally stumbled upon this federal circuit ruling that merits consideration as to why I believe that your MERS-originated mortgage loan NOTE (and potentially your security instrument that went along with it). You can read it here:

first-am-bank-v-fed-res-bk-of-atlanta-et-al-7th-app-cir-no-16-1122-nov-22-2016

I customarily do not read the entire piece of litigation unless there are specific things regarding real property law I’m looking for; however, in this case, I found some interesting UCC citations specific to Illinois that were referenced by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals (which I deem fairly conservative in their holdings on cases), in extrapolating what further happens when physical paper is converted into electronic paper, as noted here:

“…banks would drown in paper”

In this particular suit brought by First American Bank, it accused Citizens Bank of destroying a check; in other words, a spoliated (an albeit fraudulent) check, as it had been honored and then “truncated”.  This term (in quotes) is important to understand. To clarify, I’ll use the Court’s own wording in the suit:

“The Federal Reserve Board’s Regulation J, 12 C.F.R. § 210.6(b)(3)(i)(A), provides that when a Federal Reserve Bank presents an electronic check (such as the check drawn on First American) for pay- ment, “the electronic image … [must] accurately represent[] all of the information on the front and back of the original check as of the time that the original check was truncated.” By “truncated” is just meant that an electronic image is substituted for the original paper check.” Id. at 3.

Since your mortgage promissory note is also considered in the realm of debt as a negotiable instrument (even the banks will agree with me on this), the MERS® System relies on the conversion (or truncation) of the note into electronic form in order to be stored on its system. However, you and I both know that MERS does not do the conversions, right?  The users of the MERS® System do the conversions and then upload those conversions into individual files within the database known as Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.  That is what this database was created for, for the storage of electronic files.

Now for the truth of the matter … here is the Court’s own wording:

“There is no duty to retain paper checks after an electronic substitute has been made—otherwise banks would drown in paper—provided there’s a record of the contents of the paper check, as there is of course in this case; we know what the electronic check omitted, and knowing that, we know the information that the original, the paper check, contained.” Id at 5.

I hope you caught the highlighted phrase as to my realization that spoliation of the original note and mortgage (or deed of trust) happened in all MERS-related cases.  When you compare how banks used to do business, when you borrowed money from a bank, they would issue a check payable to the seller on your behalf, store the hard documents in their vault … and at least you’d know WHO you were making your payments to every month.

Caveat to this story …

There was also another interesting notation I picked up on while reading through the opinion of the Court:

“Some information that was on the original check was missing from the electronic version, but unavoidably so be- cause it was information consisting of characteristics of the check, such as watermarks, microprinting, or other physical security features that cannot survive the imaging process,” and their absence from the electronic image, being inevita- ble, was not actionable. See Regulation CC, 12 C.F.R. Part 229, App. E, § 229.51(A)(3).” Id at 3

If you continue reading onto page 4 of the Opinion, First American Bank could have demanded a “substitute check”, which is a paper printout “is deemed the legal equivalent of the original paper check.”

The foregoing statement would clearly tell me that a challenge is necessary to all promissory notes contained within the MERS® System because there is no “paper printout” or “substitute check” other than a copy of the electronic note downloaded by the foreclosing entity (most likely a REMIC), which in most cases is clearly missing certain items not found within the original note. Let’s revisit one of the previous mentions of items that cannot survive the imaging process.  One of them could seriously be an indorsement on the note, if you consider the current round of “indorsement-in-blank” arguments as to their lack of dating.  This is another one of the key reasons I believe that servicers, working in conjunction with the foreclosure mills, deliberately and purposefully create documents out of thin air for the purposes of manufacturing standing.

Also revisit the statement the Court made about what the electronic image must accurately represent (all of the information from the front and back of a check). Why do you think that when you access your online banking checks, you see both sides of the check’s image?  You never see that with a promissory note, do you?

A promissory note operates just like a check!

It has to be endorsed among the parties to show the custody of the chain of the note; otherwise, someone could come in at a point in time uncertain to a future borrower and attempt foreclosure upon their home because the chain of custody of the note was not preserved, especially in a “failed beta system” like MERS, which relies on its user-subscribers to “do the right thing” in managing their online transfers; however, there is no requirement by MERS that its user=subscribers even use the MERS® System, so long as they sign an executory contract naming MERSCORP Holdings Inc. (its parent), as the “electronic agent” in the transaction.

And you never see MERSCORP Holdings, Inc. anywhere on your paperwork, do you?  Further, once you realize that MERS and MERSCORP require its user-subscribers to indemnify MERS and MERSCORP from all liability for the errors and atrocities in its “system”, you’d also have to believe that MERS and MERSCORP have little (if any) idea what transactions are submitted by its user-subscribers unless they are actually made aware of it.  How then can MERS come into Court and say they have an interest in a promissory note they don’t even know is in their own database (or not) or was traded out of its database, when MERS itself did NOT input said data into the database?  How’s that possible?   Plainly, it doesn’t appear to be the case.

Mortgage States versus Deed of Trust States

Sadly, the difference between the two is that in a Mortgage State, you at least get your day in court.  In Deed of Trust States, all foreclosures are deemed to be legal unless otherwise legally challenged.

So the next time you’re looking at your promissory note that you managed to retrieve from the Servicer in a Qualified Written Request, remember what “version” of the promissory note you’re likely to get back.  If you lost or destroyed your copy of the files you got at closing, we need to go no further because you have no physical proof of any of the items that could or could have not reproduced on the electronic version.  This entire sham process is as bad as the sham check that was tendered to the attorney in this story.

This case does represent a mild test of the Uniform Commercial Code, at least as far as Illinois was concerned.  It merits further analysis by your attorney of record, especially when it comes to evaluating what is and isn’t contained within your promissory note.

How then can allonges (as well as indorsements) be attached AFTER the note has been scanned and uploaded into the MERS® System?  I don’t see too many attorneys revisiting that angle. Even though I predominantly deal in chain of title issues, this case tells a story of proportions equal to the sum of many promissory notes and merits further research for your understanding into the flow of promissory notes and what you’re actually presented with in Court, especially when MERS is involved.

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IF YOU ARE FACING FORECLOSURE, YOU SHOULD READ THIS!

NOTE: This post is only for the 95% of the homeowners who plan on vacating their homes as the result of pending foreclosure actions.  Don’t bother reading this post if you’re not one of those homeowners. 

So, you got a foreclosure notice in the mail?

You may be exploring this blog site for the first time.  Why?  Because you are behind in your mortgage payments and you’ve just received a Notice of Default and Sale (or a dunning letter from a law firm threatening foreclosure, claiming default and/or acceleration).

That sinking feeling …

You are not alone in your thinking.  In fact, millions of Americans have received this type of correspondence in the mail or tacked up on their door.  95% of those receiving such notices (of which you may qualify) know that their days of residence in their home is now limited because they are fully aware of their mortgage deficiencies.  Many have lost their jobs, have suffered a serious medical emergency or even have become underemployed.  Whatever the case, having no money means giving up and running away from your problem.

The bank is counting on it! 

Let’s face it … it’s a numbers game.  The mortgage servicing companies handling your loan payments and paperwork know this.  They know that 95% will capitulate and move out willingly.  This violates the terms of the security instrument.  Thou shalt not abandon thy residence, for insodoing ye shall do so at thy peril.  The fact that the mortgage payments can no longer be paid means the end of the line for many Americans. They have lost hope in surviving the legal system and start packing.  They can’t afford to hire an attorney, let alone make the payments and leaving is the ONLY option.  Many see serious legal trouble on the horizon and plan for what I call a strategic default.  I describe this in the book Clouded Titles.   If this is you, I want to hear from you!

Your lack of faith (or finances) in saving your home creates future legal problems!

What happens to your house when you leave?  There are a number of things that could go wrong without you even being there.

  1. When you move out, you still owe the payments, along with any deficiencies and service charges tacked on by the servicer.
  2. The yard becomes neglected.  That is the first sign of trouble to vagrants, druggies and homeless people.  They would love to simply move in and squat on your premises.
  3. You are still personally liable if anyone gets injured on your property.  The banks do not take title to the property until they’ve about got the home sold.  Many banks transfer title because a foreclosure has occurred and this leaves the new owner with the issues rather than the banks.
  4. The area you live in becomes blighted, creating tax deficiencies for the county, who depends on your property taxes to exist.
  5. The home itself, which many Americans have invested time and money fixing up and “making it their own”, starts to deteriorate and becomes economically stressed, losing value rather than gaining value.

The banks are counting on you simply walking away, because the party coming to claim your home may not be legally entitled to it! 

As mad as that may make you (some of you may have done some research on the Internet and have come to realize this), most of the foreclosures that occur in the United States are illegal because the paperwork is missing.  Sure you can stay in the house until the Sheriff kicks you to the curb, but the title is still screwed up.  Rather than succumb to this embarrassment, you decide to pack up your things and get while the getting is still good.

In the alternative, if you elect to do a short sale, the bank (actually, it’s the servicer) directing the activity may not be entitled to even authorize a short sale of your property!  Still, there is nothing you can do about it.

If you are one of these 95% that intend on moving out of your property, please contact me to discuss options at cloudedtitles@gmail.com.

 

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